Can Muscle Swelling Hide Upper Pole Fullness?

I just had an implant exchange from 320saline to 450 gel moderate plus. The goal was cleavage and upper pole. I have cleavage but no upper pole, I look like I did not have anything done. My dr. said that the muscle swelling is hiding the upper pole and I should start seeing more of it as the muslce swelling goes down allowing the implant not to be compressed. Is this a true finding?

Doctor Answers (7)

Upper pole fullness

+2

You didn't't say how long post op you are.If you are several weeks out your swelling should be gone.you could try to push the implants up and keep them in the upper part of the pocket by putting something in your bra to push them up.I would think with the increase in size you should have more fullness.


Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Upper pole fullness and breast implants.

+2

The upper pole of the breast at this point should be fuller, not "hidden" from swelling. If anything, it is likely to become less full as the swelling subsides. Upper pole fullness can be difficult to achieve in a moderate or moderate plus implant. This is because the volume is accommodated in the width of the implant rather than it's projection. For a fuller upper pole, you may be better off with a higher profile implant. It is however, impossible to make this assessment without a thorough exam.

David Bogue, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Loss of Upper Pole Fullness After Breast Augmentation

+1

I agree with the comments that your upper pole will look more full after surgery due to swelling.  What most patients don't realize is that as the implant becomes larger in size, the width of the implant increases more than its projection.  Therefore, depending on the style of implant chosen initially, your actual projection may not be much more than what it is now.

Having said this, I always recommend waiting at least 6 months before any revision. You need to wait until all the swelling is resolved and your breast tissue healing reaches equilibrium. Who knows, you may even like the final result!  Do not be hasty!

Michael A. Jazayeri, MD
Santa Ana Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Upper pole fullness

+1

Upper pole fullness is not masked by the muscle, in fact early on the swelling makes it look better. It will more than likely flatten more if it is still early post-op.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Upper pole breast fullness

+1

It is not true that muscle swelling will hide upper pole fullness, it makes it even fuller in fact.  The problem you have is that somehow you didn't communicate the "look" you wanted to your doctor and actually needed a HP implant to get what you wanted.  But sometimes, your body won't allow you to have what you want and you'll just need to use bras to magnify the mod+ implants.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Upper breast fullness is greatest immediately after implant surgery

+1

If your goal was to achieve maximum upper pole fullness, you should have considered over the muscle rather than under the muscle placement. Generally speaking breasts are most full in the upper pole immeadiately after surgery and as the swelling subsides the fullness diminishes in combination with descent of the implant as the lower pole expands and relaxes accomodating the implant.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Upper Pole Fullness Most Prominent Right After Surgery

+1

With any breast implant surgery, the most upper pole fullness seen is right after the surgery and for a week or two afterwards.  That is when the tissues are still a little tighter and the muscle is swollen, giving the appearance of more fullness.  As the tissues relax and the swelling gose down, the implant volume settles more towards the bottom of the implant, creating the more natural slope on top.  To say that the upper pole fullness will increase once the swelling goes down and the tissues relax is counter-intuitive and does not make alot of sense to me. I would give yourself three months of healing and then see where you are at.  I hope this helps.

Christopher V. Pelletiere, MD
Barrington Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.