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Muscle Repair Revision. Scared of headaches again from narcotics? (photo)

Two questions really, I am having a second tummy tuck (revision of muscle repair) on January 17th to pull my muscles tighter so that I no longer have the bulge up top. Do you feel like this will help? Secondly, the worst part of my first tummy tuck/breast aug was the headaches and nausea from the Percocet then the Loratab. I am so scared of the pain meds but do not want to be in pain without again. I am very sensitive to meds. Any suggestions?

Doctor Answers (2)

Exparel Great for Less Pain after Muscle Repair

+1
I recommend the use of Celebrex and Acetominophen (does not make you drowsy and less chance of nausea) plus intraoperative use of Exparel. Exparel is a very long-acting local anesthetic that lasts approximately 3 or more days following injection and great for Tummy Tucks and other surgeries. Not only does it prevent pain but also most muscle spasms. It lasts the same length of time that a pain pump lasts and will therefore take the place of a pain pump. This means patients can enjoy the same effect of a pain pump, but without any catheters and no pain pump to carry around.
Exparel will be available for those concerned about minimizing discomfort after surgeries such as tummy tuck and breast augmentation.
Exparel costs the same as a pain pump and produces the same result but with less hassle and works great.
Narcotics are used only as needed (as cause nausea, vomiting and constipation as frequent sided effects).


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Exparel to minimize pain without narcotics

+1

Your best bet might be to ask your surgeon to use Exparel, a long-acting numbing agent that is injected into the surgical site during surgery. This minimizes the discomfort so there is less need for narcotic medications.

Richard Baxter, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

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