How Long to Wait After MRSA to Consider Breast Implants?

I recently went to a consultation with a doctor for Breast implants and because I had MRSA a month ago. She said she would not perform the surgery until after a year. Is this true of most doctors or do you think I could wait about 6 months, have a culture, and if it shows I'm free of the MRSA to try again with another doctor?

Doctor Answers (4)

Where was the MRSA ?

+3

I am curious to know what part of the body had the MRSA and how you came to get MRSA?

There is a protocol for patients who have had MRSA, which includes Hibiclens showers, etc. It would be worthwhile to consult an infectious disease specialist and get their opinion. A minimum of 6 months is certainly prudent.


Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

MRSA and implants

+2

First, I would want to know where the MRSA was.  What type of infection did you have.  I would then refer you to  an infectious disease doctor to obtain his opinion, and then go from there.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

MRSA and Breast Augmentation

+2

MRSA is increasingly common bacteria that used to be found in "hospitals only" but is now frequently what we call "community acquired." Many people have the bacteria, but only a portion has significant skin infections from it - the others tend to be merely "carriers" of the bacteria.

There is no magic time frame aside from a complete resolution of the recent infection. Preoperative antibiotics (rather than after the surgery alone) and several days of anti-bacterial shower prior to surgery should be sufficient to undergo a successful surgery. It is important to remember that you need to let all of your health care providers know that you have tested positive for MRSA in the past as this may affect the choice of antibiotics or treatments that are recommended for you.

Vincent P. Marin, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

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Surgery with MRSA

+2

Yes, your suggested course sounds reasonable. I would consider consulting with an infectious disease expert to confirm this regimen and perhaps recommend appropriate personal hygiene (hibiclens showers) and peri-operative topical, oral or intravenous antibiotics.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.