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Mommy makeover scheduled in 6 weeks. I quit smoking three days ago and don't plan on going back ever. Will it be safe?

I am getting a mommy makeover to inclement BA +TT and lipo. I'm good shape for four kids. 5"6 147 pounds. I will not cheat I have been smoke free for three days and patch free for one day. I am six weeks one day out from surgery. Will It Be OK And Safe To Move Forward. Is six weeks enough to get a good result?

Doctor Answers (11)

Mommy Makeover and smoking

+1
Hello! Thank you for your question! The issue with nicotine is that it also acts as a vasoconstrictor, clamping down of blood vessels. Blood supply is always of great concern during any surgical procedure, but especially in such a procedure as a breast augmentation where the viability of the skin/tissue, and nipple-areolar complex is obviously important. Since the vascularity to the area is already tenuous since it will be raised by cutting around the area, maximizing blood flow to the tissue is critical.

Typically, we recommend at least 6 weeks of smoking cessation prior to and at least 6 weeks after any surgical procedure. The longer, the better. Nicotine always increases the risk for infection, nipple necrosis, poor scarring, and wound complications, as well as other health consequences including blood clots. The anesthesia risk is greater with general anesthesia as well as pulmonary issues/lung infections postoperatively. I would discuss this with your surgeon prior to your procedure. Hope that this helps! Best wishes!


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Is 6 weeks of nonsmoking enough to safely undergo breast augmentation, tummy tuck and liposuction?

+1
Its great that you are taking personal responsibility for your part in your upcoming surgery.  Presumably your doctor gave you the direction to stop smoking.  Very likely he or she also told you to quit smoking 4 weeks after your procedure.

John J. Edney, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Smoking and mommy makeover surgery

+1
Congratulations on your decision to stop smoking. If you stay true to yourself, remaining 6 weeks smoke free should be adequate amount of time to optimally minimize your risk of having problems with ischemia and wound healing issues. That doesn't mean that you couldn't have problems, but 4-6 weeks is the recommended amount of time to minimize your risks. Best wishes.  

William T. Stoeckel, MD
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Smoking and mommy make-over

+1
Yeah for you - stopping smoking is the best thing you will ever do for your looks and your health!
  • Six weeks before surgery will significantly reduce your risk,
  • You should be able to move ahead with surgery knowing you have greatly reduced your risk,
  • It takes 5 years of no smoking to bring your risks back to that of those who never smoked -
  • So keep up the good work for yourself and the sake of your children. Best wishes

Elizabeth Morgan, MD, PhD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

It's a good idea to quit smoking before a mommy makeover.

+1
There is no specific guidelines for the discontinuance of smoking prior to any elective cosmetic procedure. Six weeks is probably more than enough to give you The benefits from cessation of smoking.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Mommy makeover scheduled in 6 weeks. I quit smoking three days ago and don't plan on going back ever. Will it be safe?

+1
At my clinic, our patients must quit smoking for 1 month before surgery. Nicotine use greatly affects the healing capabilities of the body as well as increases your risk of infection and complications. Since you are planning to be smoke-free for 6 weeks before your planned procedure, I would safely estimate that you will be closer to your goal of achieving a good result. Of course, make sure to double check with your plastic surgeon to verify this information as all clinics differ when it comes to protocols regarding lifestyle.

Frank Lista, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Mommy makeover scheduled in 6 weeks. I quit smoking three days ago and don't plan on going back ever. Will it be safe?

+1
Very hard to response via the internet. My guess is check with your surgeon first. For me there is a slim higher statistical risk to postop issues.. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

Mommy makeover scheduled in 6 weeks. I quit smoking three days ago and don't plan on going back ever. Will it be safe?

+1
   In general, 6 weeks is enough time prior to those surgeries.

Find a plastic surgeon who performs hundreds of mommy makeover each year, has great reviews, and has great before and after pictures.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 237 reviews

Smoking cessation prior to cosmetic surgery is important

+1
Congratulations on stopping smoking ! Its probably the best single thing you can do for your long term health during your adult life. I tell my smoking patients to stop all nicotine consumption (including e-cigs !) 6 weeks prior to surgery and for at least 6 weeks after surgery. Nicotine directly impacts wound healing in a number of ways.

Scott C. Sattler, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Smoking and Surgery

+1
The more time away from smoking the better. In my opinion 6 weeks is enough time to be smoke free. Just as important however is not smoking after surgery. Make sure that you are not taking any other nicotine substitutes because they will affect your ability to heal as well. Additionally hyperbaric oxygen therapy post surgery can be helpful as well.

Good Luck

Hope this helps

Ritu Chopra MD

Ritu Chopra, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.