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I Had a Mole Removed from my Face a Month Ago and I Still Have a Small Hole?

I had a mole removed from my face and a single stitch put in. I kept it covered with a band aid for a week and the stitches were removed on day 5. I still have a small but fairly noticeable hole, right in the middle of my face. I have tried covering it with makeup but it doesn't help and just disappears into the hole. Will the hole heal eventually??

Doctor Answers (3)

Mole Removal

+1

Thank you for your question. Everyone heals differently. I would apply Mederma or Scarguard to help with the scar. Avoid sun exposure and wear daily SPF 30 with zinc. I would wait for 6 weeks until completely healed and reassess the area for laser or an injectable filler to help with the indentation. I hope this helps.


Bay Area Dermatologist
4.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Scar after mole removal

+1

It depends on the size of the hole you have noticed. You may still be a candidate for mole removal, so discuss this with your surgeon at your earliest convenience. Raffy Karamanoukian, Los Angeles

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Divet after mole removal

+1

You should not have kept it covered and should have kept it clean and gooped up with Vaseline, Polysporin, etc. What happens if you don't keep it moist is that a scar forms and fills in the hole. When the scab comes off, you are left with a divet or a tiny hole. If you had kept it moist, the new skin would have formed over the goop, and not created a divet or hole there. The hole won't heal and won't fill in by itself. You could have it re-excised and follow better postcare, but no, it will never completely flatten out.

F. Victor Rueckl, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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