Mole On Upper Lip- Is Shaving The Best Option For Removal To Keep Lip Shape?

I am considering removing two moles on my upper lip because they can be irritating when I shave. I have been told by a friend that shaving would be the best course of action because they are raised and excision could distort my lip. I wanted to know if shaving would be the best course of action and what are my options for removing the mole, but keeping the shape of my lip? I know their will be scaring and possible pigment left over, but are their any other concerns I should be aware of?

Doctor Answers (7)

Mole removal

+1

I would highly recommend that you see a board certified facial plastic surgeon for an evaluation and possible treatment. 


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 140 reviews

Mole excision

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Both shave exision and elliptical excision are options. The pros and cons of each should be discussed with you.  I dont believe exision will cause distortion of the lip.  in my opinion both options are reasonable and if done properly will give a good aesthetic outcome. The disadvantage of shave excision is that the lesion can recur.  If you have shave excision performed an elman surgitron device or Co2 laser is helpful to treat the base of the lesion and reduce the chance of recurrence.

Philip Solomon, MD
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Possible shaving of moles

+1

In my opinion shaving the moles off and leaving the base of the moles is malpractice. Not only will it look worse than a quality and proper excision but if there are abnormal cells in the moles they are left to flourish and case future problems. Also the partially excised mole may start to grow and then you are back to where you started. Get a simple verticle ellipse excision by a good surgeon and send the moles off to pathology.

Richard Galitz, MD, FACS
Miami Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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You will probably be happiest with upper lip mole excision

+1

Shaving these moles will not insure they will not recur (I.E. If you shave off the top half of a ball even with the skin surface the bottom half under the skin may still grow). Thus, excision will likely give you the best cosmetic result. You should discuss the options with a board certified plastic surgeon

Todd C. Case, MD
Tucson Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Excising the 2 moles will give the best cosmetic effect.

+1

You should have your moles excised rather than shaved since cosmetically they would look better and not deform your lip in any way.  Expect to pay about $350 each under local and almost painlessly.  Sincerely,  

David Hansen,MD

David Hansen, MD
Beverly Hills Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Best Method of Mole Removal on the Upper Lip

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Moles are quickly and easily removed in my office by one of two methods: a shave excision or an excision with suture closure. Because of the size and location of your moles, I recommend that they be removed by excising a very small ellipse of skin. I then use a "layer closure" using both dissolving and non-dissolving sutures to give the best cosmetic result. The area then typically heals with a small, linear scar that is hardly visible. Done properly, there should be no distortion when the areas have healed. The results of your surgery will very much depend upon the skill of the physician doing the surgery.

 

Mitchell Schwartz, MD
South Burlington Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

A careful excision will look much better than a shave excision.

+1

In my Many many years experience, having removed over 10000 moles, a careful plastic excision permanently removes the mole, any associate hairs and gives the best cosmetic result.

Mark Taylor, MD
Salt Lake City Dermatologic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.