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Clogged Pores Affecting Mixto Laser Results?

I had Mixto Fractional Laser Skin Resurfacing done 2 weeks ago, but don't see any difference for my large pores and acne scars. Do clogged pores impair the resurfacing? Also, if the skin begin resurfacing on my face, how is it possible for the groves in my skin to "fill up"?

Doctor Answers (2)

Clogged pores after Mixto treatment

+3

Hi there-

You must be patient when determining results from Mixto. 

The small areas of laser penetration contract over time, giving a smoother appearance and tightening of the skin.

As collagen production is stimulated, from the bottom up, the skin will look smoother and the pores less noticeable. 

However, enlarged pores also come from oil that is not adequately removed and causes the pore to stretch. Make sure you are using a dermatologic product to remove oil and other debris.  The Clarisonic brush does a very good job of removing this debris from the pores. 


Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 103 reviews

Mixto for acne scars and pore size

+2

Congratulations on picking a great skin rejuvenation treatment. Mixto works very well to treat acne scars and may help to diminish the appearance of pore size. The collagen that is built by this treatment can take up to 3 months or more to develop. Most patients need a series of treatments for acne scarring. Your cosmetic surgeon may have used "higher settings" which might allow improvement form one treatment alone. The appearance of pore size can change from treatments but pore size itself may not change.

By groves in the skin do you mean the Nasolabial fold or the line by the lip area? If so, this will not change markedly from any laser fractional treatment.

Mark Berkowitz, MD
Sterling Heights Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.