Is It Safe to Have Multiple Surgeries at Once?

I am having a fibroid removed from my uterus and extended mini tummy tuck and breast implant redo all at the same time. Is it ok to have all 3 surgeries at the same time?

During my extended mini-tummy tuck my doctor will detach the belly button from the stalk, tighten the fascia mucles all the way up and reattach my belly button 1 inch lower.

Doctor Answers (8)

More procedures, the greater the complication risks

+2

This is a good question! When to know if one is undergoing too many procedures at once? There is no cut and dry answer here, as the answer depends on many variables.

These variables include, but are not limited to, your overall health, the place the procedures are to be performed, the physicians, and the length of time you will need to be asleep for these procedures. All of this increases your ultimate risk for potential complications. Two of these procedures are considered elective or for cosmetic reasons, and therefore are not necessary to perform at the same time.

All surgical procedures come with potential complications. The more procedures, the greater the risk for complications, so make sure you review all of these with your doctors.


Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Gyn procedure with tummy tuck

+1

Its safe as long as you are healthy, the surgery is not for cancer and the planned procedure is "clean". That is it does not involve bowel. Also, its important to know the length of the combined operations given that increased lenght corelated with increased risk of complications. You should definetely have a discussion with your doctor(s) regarding your procedure to get their professional opinion. Good Luck!

Raj S. Ambay, MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Mini tummy tuck and gyn procedure

+1

If you are healthy, combining some procedures is usually okay.  I have done tummy tucks combined with non-cancerous related gyn procedures, but you have to be selective.  Speak with your doctors.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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Multiple surgery safety

+1

The answer is really dependent on the individual patient, and what the procedures are.  There will be increased risk with longer procedures.  If you are in good health, multiple procedures may be appropriate.  The tummy tuck with hysterectomy has become more popular for example.

Very important to share with your board certified plastic surgeon your goals, and your entire health history, (including herbal supplements, etc).  He can then determine risk of surgery and if you are a candidate for one or multiple procedures.

Jeffrey Roth, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Having a mini tummy tuck with gynecologic surgery

+1

In our practice, it is common to perform abdominal recontouring surgery at the same time as a conical logic procedure. For these patients, we will typically begin the procedure by placing the incisions and lifting the flap of skin and fat. At this time to gynecologic surgeon can come in and perform any surgery that they need to. We then assist the gynecologist in repairing the muscle and fascia. We can then complete the mini tummy tuck or regular tummy tuck. During the surgeries, you may also receive a breast lift or a breast augmentation without difficulty. Patients appreciate having a single recovery process for these three procedures.
 

Pat Pazmino, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Multiple surgeries increase risk

+1

It is common and safe to combine abdominoplasty with uterine surgery to remove fibroids.

Adding the breast augmentation to an extended abdomenoplasty will increase the time in the OR, complicate recovery and increase the risk of complications such as blood clots in your legs.

I would do the breast augmenation as a second procedure at a later date.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Multiple surgeries and Multiple specialists

+1

While I appreciate your desire to combine cosmetic and reconstructive, it's also important not to compromise your safety. Multiple procedures are frequently performed, although all PS carefully screen their patient's medical history, beforehand to select the most appropriate candidates. Remember abdominoplasty, breast revisions can be performed in tandem, assuming the patient is evaluated to be fit. In our practice we screen patients with pre-op labs, EKG, CXR and occasionally refer them back to their personal physicians for clearance.

When you introduce another factor, another physician and another plane of dissection, you up the ante substantially. Your surgical results wil depend on the conduct of the myomectomy (removal of the fibroid). Assuming that the Gynecologic portion and the PS procedures can be done within 6 hours, your risk from hypothermia, blood loss, infection should be acceptable. good luck.

Lavinia Chong, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Risks of muliple little surgeries worse than a single longer surgery?

+1

We all wish we knew the answer to this but we don't. Clearly, we understand the desire on behalf of the patient to get it over with in one fell swoop.

However, we recognize that there are certain risks to prolonged general anesthetic times. The most discussed of these, is the potential to develop a blood clot, which can break free and travel to the heart, lungs, or brain. We all know that the risk is elevated when surgery lasts longer than 1-2 hours, but we don't know what the difference in risk from a 3 or 5 or 6 hour operation is. It would be similar to asking whether 5 airline trips each traveling 1000 miles more risky than one 5000 mile plane trip. Pardon the oversimplification.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.