Mini TT with Lipo is Now Infected?

Hi doctors, it's been 4.5 weeks since my mini TT with flank and belly lipo. I developed a seroma which they have been performing serial aspiration upon. (1) My fluid remained dark red at all aspirations, what is the protocol for that??(2) my aspirations were 500ml, then 4 days later: 200ml, then 175ml and then (I got infected) and only 20ml came out next time. My infection was caught early and I'm on avelox, but it has stopped my serial aspiration. I'm worried about bursa development. Plz advise

Doctor Answers (2)

Complications after Mini-Tummy Tuck

+2

Seromas are one of the most common complications of abdominoplasty surgery. Serial aspirations and/or drain placement is required for treatment. Unfortunately, with any intervention, there is a risk for infection. I am sure your plastic surgeon will adequately drain or aspirate any residual fluid collection that is under the skin. Small residual pockets of fluid may reabsorb on their own without bursa formation.  It is less common to have a bursa after seroma treatment that affects surgical results, so for the time being I would not worry about it. Be patient and continue treatment for your infection. It may take months and up to 1 year for swelling to resolve from the area. If you have any contour problems affecting your results, I am sure your physician will advise you about whether or not you could have a bursa interfering with your results. 


Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Treatment of an infected tummy tuck

+1

Treatment of your seroma should continue in the setting of the infection so as not to seed the seroma with bacteria. Sterile technique is a primary goal. Raffy Karamanoukian, Los Angeles

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

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