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A Mini Lift Appropriate After Korean Zygoma and Mandible Reduction Surgery?

I am a 29 years old asian female, and last December I underwent zygoma, mandible reduction and acculift in Korea. I have always had a bit of baby fat on my cheeks, and now it seems that my face is even chubbier. I do not know whether it is because of sagging after the facial bone surgeries, or because the pushing in of my zygoma naturally made the lower third of my face look heavier. I would say that my skin tone is still quite good. Would a mini-lift help restore a proper face proportion?

Doctor Answers (6)

A Mini Lift Appropriate After Korean Zygoma and Mandible Reduction Surgery?

+4

The surgeries you had cause a lot of swelling that may take up to a year to resolve. As a surgeon who performs this type of surgery, I can attest to this. Once, a year has passed, then you may reevaluate your face. There may be some ptosis of facial soft tissues after these surgeries but it is too soon to tell how much.


Huntington Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Face lift

+3

Most probably the soft tissue dropped down as the supporting boney skeleton was reduced.You nned a full evaluation including x-ray to see what was done.

Then you need to be clear as to the look you want (write it down, get your old pictures, before the Korean surgery) and discuss with a BOARD CERTIFIED PLASTIC SURGEON, (AMERICAN BOARD OF PLASTIC SURGERY)

Possible liposuction, cheeck fat removal and a miniface lift.all should be expolored.

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

Mini Facelift

+2

I would recommend that you have a personalized consultation with a board certified facial plastic surgeon who can best address your areas of concern.  Unfortunately, I have had many patients who require revision surgery following surgery in Korea or Asia with less than desired results.

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Face lift after zygomatic and mandible reduction

+2
It appears you have fullness in the lower portion of your cheeks due to fatty tissue and ptosis after the zygomatic and mandibular reduction. You may still present with some swelling from the past surgeries domit is my feeling you would benefit from waiting an entire year before evaluation. At that time upon a physical evaluation I would discuss the many options you may have to help your features be more proportionate. Liposuction, bucal fat removal, possible face lift or mini lift with SMAS. Again give a full year and discuss with your surgeon where he thinks you are in the healing phase and how much swelling he believes you are still experiencing. Best regards!

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

Would a mini face lift help me?

+2

 I have performed face lifts for over 20 years including the newer minimal incision variations.  From your photos, the lower half of the face appears to have marked lipodystrophy (excess fat) that makes it appear overly round and not the aesthetically desired heart shape.  In these cases, I typically perform facial micro-liposuction of that area and if the skin and SMAS layers are loose, a minimal incision face lift will help.  The decrease of skeletal structure from the mandible and zygomatic reductions may be the cause of this tissue laxity at 29 years of age.  The procedure, as I perform it takes about 90 minutes and patients can fly back home at ~ 3 days post op.  Hope this helps.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Do I ned a minilift

+1

In the type of bone reduction you had, the tissues of the cheek will lose their support and fall. Although a mini-lift might help, you need to understand that you now have less structural support than you used to so how long the proposed mini-lift will last for is hard to tell.

Julio Garcia, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.