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Can a Mild Chemical Peel be Used to Reduce Periareolar Scar Hyperpigmentation?

I am 6 months post-op from gynecomastia treatment. My surgeon used a peri-areloar incision to remove both glandular tissue and perform liposuction. The scar was kept under pressure for over 2 months and was massaged daily for about 3-4 months. Overall it has healed rather well. There is a small degree of hyperpigmentation on the edges of the scar. I think the scar would be virtually unnoticable if it weren't for the hyperpigmentation. Is a very mild chemical peel safe? Will it help?

Doctor Answers 3

Chemical Peel for Hyperpigmentation of Scar

Scars take a good 12-18 months to get to their final color. Redness usually fades and the brown hyperpigmentation starts to fade.  I would recommend starting with some type of fade cream, such as a 4% hydroquinone that your plastic surgeon can perscribe..  If that does not work then a Vi-Peel or TCA peel might be helpful.  Good luck.

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 101 reviews

901 Boren Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104

Scar at 6 months

It is quite common to have some redness or hyperpigmentation that may last up to a year and sometimes longer.  Sometimes IPL can help.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

1049 Fifth Ave
New York, NY 10028

This skin will not tolerate this peel.

To get rid of hyper pigmentation, the chemical peel must penetrate into the skin deep enough to reach the pigment.  The peri-areloar skin will not heal well from this type of treatment.  You might considered having non ablative laser treatment to help this.  Look for a dermatologist who has a broad array of lasers in their practice.  This allows them to choose the right tool for the job.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

9001 Wilshire Blvd
Beverly Hills, CA 90211

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