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Do Microcurrent Face Lifts Work?

Do microcurrent face lifts with portable massagers work to increase skin tone and remove wrinkles?

Doctor Answers 12

Microcurrent Facelifts

   Microcurrent facelifts may have some small effect but this is not supported in the literature.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Does microcurrent tighten the face

I have seen no scientific evidence to support the procedure. I have seen a lot of Oprah, Dr. Oz, the doctors evidence but as we all know that is just tv fluff.

Richard Ellenbogen, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Is a micro current face lift effective?

Jowling, neck laxity, midface sagging, and brow sagging are all elements of aging that are best addressed with surgical manipulation using face and brow lifting techniques. Dynamic wrinkle lines such as crows feet and glabellar frown lines are non-invasively addressed using neurotoxins such as botox and disport. Static lines in the face can be addressed with fillers, laser resurfacing, or a combination of the two.

My understanding is that there is very little evidence to support the effectiveness of micro current technology. I would be very cautious of spending your valuable resources on a procedure that will like provide a minimal benefit.

Todd C. Miller, MD
Newport Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Microcurrent facelifts do not work.


In my opinion, this is just false advertising.  Do you remember reading about the snake oil salesmen of the 19th Century?  This is the modern equivalent.

Real facelifts work very well, and they are safe.  So are Botox, fillers, and laser resurfacing.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Do Microcurrent Face Lifts Work?

In my experience, developing one of these devices, yes but a modest amount and while doing something can not be compared to an incision, SMAS tightening Face Lift with removal of 2-3 inches of excess skin.  In my mind all of these non-surgical devices have their place...the trick is understanding how to classify the results, of each, realistically.  

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Do Microcurrent Facelifts Work?

There is no documented evidence that microcurrent facelifts work. If they did we all would offer this technique in a day when patients want a non-invasive procedure to achieve the desired result whenever possible.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Facelift, lite lift, and microcurrent

facelifts of any type will always provide more benefit than non surgical methods

muscle stimulation, exercise, topical soluriong and injectables all have some place in te cre and maintenance of your face

electrical stimualation is not well studied 

skin care products, microdermabraision and peels all have provenefficacy

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Non-surgical facelift devices

It would be fair to say that if such electrical stimulation, massaging and exercise regimens worked to produce even a fraction of what a surgical facelift could do, everyone would know it and they would be selling for thousand of dollars apiece.  While they are physically harmless, they are not a good use of your time or money.

It depends on what you mean by work?

They stimulate muscle contraction.  Some people believe that this improves the tone of the facial muscles.  There is no real evidence of that.  Generally I think it is a harmless service but no it makes no real difference for the appearance.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Do Microcurrent Face Lifts Work?

They probably work a little bit as long as the current is on. But not much benefit otherwise. There is no known substitute for a surgical facelift if you have the aging changes that would be improved by that surgery.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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