Sunken Area After Revision?

I had scar revision surgery on the bridge of my nose. My doctor performed a V-Y plasty to remove a scar 3 months ago. Although redness and swelling have subsided very much to this day, I am worried about the "sunken" appearance of the area. My bridge looks dented from a profile view (the incision line itself is barely visible), and although it has been improving little by little since my surgery, I don't know if I should do anything else (fillers, perhaps?) to improve the outcome. Many thanks!

Doctor Answers (3)

Complications after nasal skin excision

+2

The nasal skin is pulled more taut when closing the defect from a scar or lesion excision. This leads to the relative depression seen on the profile view. This may lessen with time as the surrounding skin stretches.  Persistent depressions on the bridge can be filled temporarily with injectable filler or permanently with cartilage grafts.


Westchester Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Sunken area of nose--how to fix?

+2

Dear M9867-

This is a very specific issue, not too common, that would really require a personal exam to determine if/when to perform additional procedures.  What I can tell you is that in general, 3 months is still fairly early for healing of any wound, and things may change.  During that time, trying to fix it may be like trying to fix a moving target, and it is generally best to wait about 6-9 months (up to a year, depending on the situation).....

Sam Most, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Sunken Area After Revision?

+1

      This would be difficult to evaluate without an examination of the area.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 230 reviews

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