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What's Best for Anti Aging That Does Not Involve Surgery?

If plastic surgery is out of the question what are the best alternatives for a 60 year old? Fillers I hate, botox I love, Vit A is a must, Vit C makes me red, IPL is fantastic, FRAXEL IS BRILLIANT but costly and I use a derma roller which provides pleasing results. In general, am I on the right track? Secondly, my particular issues are redness and a lack of definition/angle at the jaw neck region any suggestions? I have a mouth exerciser do they work? Boring to use. :(

Doctor Answers (3)

Non surgical facial rejuvenation

+2

The best non-surgical  best treatment  texture, pores and fine lines is the microablative fractionated CO2 laser like SmartSkin. This laser is very effective for wrinkles, acne scars, and improving skin texture.  You seem to have a fair skin complexion.  This laser treatment is very precise and predictable.  You will have two days of swelling, two days of peeling and two days of redness.  To maintain your result I would consider using SkinMedica TNS essential serum with growth factors.

Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

The 3D Vectoring Facelift (Vectoral Sculpturing) Is An Effective Nonsurgical Approach To Facial & Neck Rejuvenation

+2

I'm not quite sure what the problem is with fillers or how long ago and by whom you were treated. However, what I can say is that kinds that are available today and their use for vectoring and volumizing has certainly put them at the forefront of nonsurgical approaches to facial and neck aging, and, for this reason, I believe these newer uses should at least be mentioned in the event that you are not familiara with them. I have personally performed them successfully on many people 60+ years of age.

Fortunately, over the last decade our understanding of how our skin ages has undergone a revolution. Whereas once the visible signs of facial and neck aging were attributed exclusively to skin laxity or looseness, today, we know that the sagging, drooping, wrinkling, textural alterations, etc that characterize the passage of time are a result of a number of anatomical and physiological events. These include loss in the quality and quantity of collagen and elastic fibers, largely due to years of accumulated sun exposure and other environmental damage; an increase in facial expression muscle activity (hyperkinesis);  loss of facial volume (due to decreases in fat, bone, cartilage and muscle); weakening of the retaining ligaments that suspend and hold the skin and underlying tissues in place; and the fragmentation and downward displacement--due to the effects of gravity--of the fat compartments that are responsible for giving fullness, smoothness, and youthful contour to the face and neck. The result of this gravitational pull on compromised, devolumized facial tissue is that the face loses its youthful triangular shape and takes on a more boxy look as the jowls and neck sag.

To illustrate what happens to our skin as we age, just Imagine a fully expanded dining room table covered with a beautiful, smooth table cloth that hangs just so halfway down each of the sides of the table. Now consider what would happen if you were to remove both leaves from the middle of the table. Not surprisingly, the table cloth that draped so beautifully now droops down to the floor. To restore the table cloth to its proper position, you wouldn't conclude that it had gotten too loose and proceed to cutting it down all the way around the table to shorten it. You would simply reinsert the leaves of the table and voila. However, for decades, physicians perceived jowls and turkey necks and sagging cheeks to be simple laxity (skin hanging) and merely cut away the "excess" tissue" as part of surgical facelifts, necklifts and eyelifts--often creating artificial, cadaverous, skeleton-like, overly pulled tight faces--giving rise to the obvious and much dreaded,  "They've been done" look..

Today, we can address many aging skin changes nonsurgically in a matter of minutes with little or no downtime. For muscle overactivity, we have neuromodulators, such as Botox, Dysport and Xeomin. For roughness, textural changes, skin dullness and mottled pigmentation, we have topical prescription medications, chemical peels, medical microneedling, etc. For fine wrinkles, we have fillers and for deeper furrows and volume loss, we have developed volumizing injectable fillers. And now, for sagging skin and apparent laxity, we have the Nonsurgical 3D Vectoring Lift.

A vector describes a magnitude and direction of force. Aging skin is characterized by a negative downward and inward vector of sagging. To counter this, surgeons traditionally pulled skin upward and outward--i.e. using a positive vector. The key difference between the outcomes of traditional surgical correction and nonsurgical 3D vectoring, both of which lift upwards and outwards, is the Nonsurgical 3D Vectoring Lift's additional corrective dimension of ‘forward projection’. This 3D effect is the result of volumizing with the use of injectable agents designed for this purpose, such as Radiesse, Voluma, Restylane SQ, and Stylage XXL.

The Nonsurgical 3D Vectoring Lift is predicated upon the fact that the face and portions of the neck differ in their degree of mobility. The region directly in front and behind the ears is a fixed, denser, relatively immobile area, in contrast to the mid-cheek region (hence the greater tendency of this region to sag with the passage of time). These anatomical differences are exploited in the Nonsurgical 3D Vectoring Lift by making the fixed areas serve as anchoring points for the mobile tissues.

In determining the positive vectors for the mid to lower face, the tissues that require lifting are identified by pulling the skin directly in front of the ears in a direction perpendicular to the area that requires correction. If the pulling results in lifting of the desired tissue, then the vector has been correctly identified and is then marked in accordance with 3D vectoring protocol. A similar approach is used in the region of the bone in back of the ear when dealing with neck laxity. One the proper vectors are marked, the volumizing agents are injected in a series of radiating bands that serve as support struts to the skin and that impart the necessary 3D outward projection--the lift--that distinguishes and defines this nonsurgical approach. The high viscosity and elasticity of the volumizing fillers serves to hold and re-support the overlying tissue and restore more youthful contours.

Although volumizing fillers are reabsorbed over time, they do promote new, native collagen synthesis, which may continue to provide structure, firmness and improved skin quality while continuing to lift tissues. A typical Nonsurgical 3D Vectoring Lift of the face takes about fifteen minutes to perform. Bruising and swelling tend to be minimal, and most people can return to work or social activities immediately following treatment.

Web reference: http://YoungerLookingWithoutSurgery.com

New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Laxity of skin - non surgical rejuvenation

+1

You have such an open ended query that can be addressed in 2 pages of writing .... so, in regards to non surgical procedures consider and read about Ultherapy as it is excellent and there is a book written about it that is available on Kindle and Nook.

Web reference: http://www.AdvanceYourBeauty.com

Buffalo General Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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