Medical Grade Silicone Injections? Why Not?

If medical grade silicone injections are not toxic or unsafe to your body why can they not be injected into your buttocks besides the possibility of granuloma and migration. This is being done internationally by doctors. Is this only being told as a ''No No" because it is not FDA approved in the U.S. and a professional "Doctor" You cannot agree with this practice?

Doctor Answers (3)

Correcting liquid silicone complications in Los Angeles

+1

I see many patients with silicone liquid injections and have seen many complications in the short and longterm.  I would advise against the injections as I have devoted part of my practice to reconstructing patients with these complications from other physicians. Raffy Karamanoukian, Los Angeles


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Silicone For Buttock Augmentation?

+1

Our practice is one of, if not, the biggest practice worldwide for silicone use as an injectable filler for lip augmentation, aging lines, facial volume loss, earlobe and hand rejuvenation, neck lines, traumatic and surgical scars, and acne scars. In the US, silicone as an injectable filler for these purposes is considered off-label despite the fact that silicone is FDA approved (it is approved for retinal issues).  When injected properly by experienced doctors, silicone does not cause granulomas and does not migrate. The key to using silicone properly is not injecting too much at once. Therefore, injections into the buttocks for enlargement/enhancement is not an ideal use of silicone as a filler in my opinion. Can it be done? sure. Is it being done? Yes, but mostly by inexperienced doctors or injectors who are not licensed physicians.

Channing R. Barnett, MD
New York Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Silicone injections

+1

In the US some doctors do inject medical grade silicone for facial augmentation, but I have seen many patients with problems from it from granulomas, to erythema, to visibility and palpability.  It is very difficult to impossible to treat/correct.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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