Medial Epicanthoplasty Scar is Hypertropic 3 Months Post-Op, Will this Fade? (photo)

I did medial epicanthoplasty on 1 oct 2011, it's been over 2 months and nearly 3 months, the scars have turned white, on my right eye the bottm of the scar is flat but the top is hypertropic, raised. On my left eye, the scar is very obvious, raised, hypertropic. Are the scars permanent? Is there anyway to improve or remove the scars? As right now, if i do not put on makeup, it is very obvious that i had done surgery on my eyes. I have included a picture. Thank you.

Doctor Answers (4)

Medial epicanthoplasty scar from asian blepharoplasty

+1

Scarring from this procedure is not uncommon. Your scar should improve. You could have your doctor consider some kenalog injections. Medial epicanthoplasty can be done more in the corner of your eye to decrease the risk of scarring.


Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Medial epicanthoplasty scar

+1

Yes, it will improve. Avoid cigarette smoke exposure, avoid sun or always use sunblock, and massage with fingers. 

Charles S. Lee, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Medial epicanthoplasty scar

+1

  I agree with the last doctor's reply.  I think you should wait at least a year, and maybe longer, before considering any scar revision.  Conservative methods until then are best.  hopefully, your surgeon warned you about this and will work with you until the scar heals to your satisfaction.  Good luck!

Lawrence Kass, MD
Saint Petersburg Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

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Scar after epicanthoplasty

+1

It takes a year for a scar to mature. It is possible that the scar may soften in the next few months. If not, a steroid treatment may expedite the healing. Before considering any type of surgical revision, give your scar a chance to heal.

Suzanne Kim Doud Galli, MD, PhD, FACS
Reston Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.