After Revision Rhinoplasty, my Dr. Says I Have a "Growth," Connecting my Nose to my Cheek?

It's above my nostril like a little bridge -- I dislike it very much -- and when I smile, it looks very odd, although he placed ear cartilage to fill the dent that resulted after the revision rhinoplasty. I asked to have the cartilage removed, as it looks obvious. What could have caused this growth and can it be removed? It looks like a white bump about 1/4 inch round or so that connects to my nose. It's hard to explain, but has anyone heard of anything like this? I have fair skin.

Doctor Answers (4)

Growth in Area of Previous Cartilage Graft

+1

    The growth in an area of a previous cartilage graft is likely scar tissue that surrounded the cartilage.


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 203 reviews

Scar after Rhinoplasty

+1

As others mentioned a photo would be best to get a better idea of what you are referring to.  Scar tissue, stitch reaction, extruded cartilage or sebaceous cyst are all possible options to name just a few.

Jill Hessler, MD
Palo Alto Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

"Growth" on nose following revision rhinoplasty.

+1

Without photos or better yet, a physcial examination, it is not possible to say for sure what your surgeon is referring to as a "growth", really is.  It can be one of several possibilities including a protruding cartilage graft, a skin tumor or scar.  I would ask your surgeon to be more specific and see what he can do about it.  A second opinion would also be a good idea at this point.

Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS, FRCSC.

 

Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

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Growth on Nose after Rhinoplasty

+1

Please send pictures so we can tell exactly where the growth is and what it looks like. I'm sure it is hard to explain and describe.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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