Can a nose's alar naturally reduce when the bridge and tip is refined? (photo)

I am a Hispanic woman that would like not only her nose refined, but her nostrils reduced. The doc I saw said he would decide about reducing the nostrils after the bridge and tip is done (appropriately so, I totally agree). If those two parts were perfected, would the nostrils some how fall into place better? Or is alar reduction always a second, necessary step?

Doctor Answers (3)

Hispanic alar reduction

+2

Hi Bella, When narrowing the nasal tip by reducing and reshaping the cartilage the nostril shape will change slightly. This does not narrow the alar base width. The decision to narrow the alar base can be made preoperatively and done at the time of the rhinoplasty. The natural width of the alar base, from the outside of one nostril to the other should be the same as the distance between the inner canthus of your eyes or the inner corner of the eyes. Hope this helps.


Detroit Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Alar base reduction

+2

Usually if the nose is wide or has significant flare, then the alar base procedure is warranted. Some will stage it to see how things heal up first if they are not sure.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Can a nose's alar base naturally reduce when the bridge and tip is refined?

+2

If the tip and bridge are reduced, this can change the appearance of the alar base. Alar base reduction, if unsure, can be performed under local at a later date. Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of rhinoplasties and rhinoplasty revisions each year. Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.
Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

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