Should I Wait On a Mammogram If I Still Have Tenderness After BA?

I received implants/benelli lift a year ago and am just now starting to get full sensation back in my nipples. I still have some minimal pain and numbness in my breasts/areolas. I have been told I am a slow healer by by both my PS and ob/gyn. After a long plateau I feel recently more optimistic that my breasts will be pain free and regain full sensitivity. I am now due for a mammogram. Should I wait since there is still tenderness?

Doctor Answers (13)

No reason to wait for a mammogram

+2

Sensory recovery after a breast augmentation with a lift (especially a Binelli periareolar lift) would likely take up to a year.  If you are due for a mammogram I would go ahead and do it from a health standpoint, even if there is some mild discomfort.  The radiology technicians are pretty good now with various positioning and views that they should be able to get the study done without much discomfort.  Good luck!


Sincerely,

James F. Boynton, M.D., F.A.C.S.


Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Mammogram after breast augmentation

+2
At one year post-augmentation, there are no contraindications to having your mammogram as scheduled. It is important to tell the mammographer that you have had a breast augment and request that you are handled with care.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

No need to wait.

+2

Hello,

You will not do any harm in getting a mammogram at this time.  If you have no family or personal history or breast cancer you could certainly wait a few more months but there is no reason to wait if you are concerned that you will harm your breast augmentation.  You can also touch base with your primary care doctor regarding his/her opinion of how important it is for you to get your mammogram on time.  From the plastic surgery standpoint there will be no issue.

All the best,

Dr Repta

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 92 reviews

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It would be advisable to follow the ACS guidelines regarding your mammogram. If a person is due, then scheduling the test is appropriate.

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In general, I usually have my patients wait 6 months to obtain a mammogram. If it is needed sooner, it is certainly not a problem to do so even if the breasts are still tender.

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At this jpoint the mammogram will not affect your recovery.  You may experience some discomfort with breast compression, but it will not cause your sensation to worsen.

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I would recommend proceeding with the mammogram.  This should not affect your breast discomfort or result.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon.

Donald Nunn, MD
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Should I Wait On a Mammogram If I Still Have Tenderness After BA?

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If you can obtain a verbal OK from the PS and OB/GYN than waiting a few months (no longer than 3 months) would be acceptable. But again have YOUR own docs tell you not us over the internet! 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
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If you are a year out from surgery, it is certainly reasonable to go for mammogram at this point.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
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+1

A year out after breast augmentation you should begin mammography. Also perform monthly self breast exam to learn the differences in your new post augmentation breasts.  Patients are often more attuned to differenced in their own examination.  The OB usually sees you just yearly and may not pick up on subtle defferences.

 

 

Adam Tattelbaum, MD
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.