Found Lump After Breast Enlargment Surgery, Is this Normal?

Just had surgery over week ago. Using 525cc silicone inplants now i have just found small lump under my right breast. Is this normal

Doctor Answers (9)

Mass under right breast 1 week post breast augmentation

+1

If this small lump hadn't been present prior to surgery which I assume was the case, then it is unlikely to be anything of major significance (especially when described as small). There are several possibilities of what this could represent. You should point this out to your surgeon at your next visit which should be fairly soon and get an explanation of this.


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Lump in breast 1 week after breast augmentation

+1

A lump in the breast, at anytime, should be evaluated thoroughly by your physician. Fortunately, you are very early in your post-operative period so you should have several appointments with your surgeon in which your lump can be evaluated and addressed in a timely fashion. Be sure to point this out to your doctor at your follow-up appointments. If you do not have an appointment for several weeks, I would encourage you to call your surgeon and ask for a sooner appointment so that the lump can be evaluated.

Antonio Gayoso, MD
Saint Petersburg Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

"Lump" after Breast Augmentation?

+1

Thank you for the question.

I would suggest that online consultation is not the appropriate place to seek advice regarding a breast “lump”.  Even though you have recently had surgery this finding could be significant and should be evaluated expeditiously by your physicians. Nothing will replace physical examination and possible radiographic evaluation as well.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 682 reviews

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Early healing after breast surgery

+1

early healing after breast surgery may have a variety of findings:

  • swelling
  • asymmetry 
  • lumps and bumps
  • discomfort
  • tingling , burning
  • give this 4-6 weeks to settle but keep an eye on how the "lump" changes

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
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Lump after surgery

+1

It is difficult to say what the lump could be after a breast augmentation, It could be a hematoma, fluid the implant, to name a few.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Lump after breast surgery

+1

A breast lump after surgery could be any one of a number of things and most of them are nothing to worry about. Your surgeon is the best person to evaluate your lump and advise you as to what to do about it. Make sure you point it out on your next visit.
 

Margaret Skiles, MD
Sacramento Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Lump after augmentation

+1

I would recommend that you let your surgeon examine you to determine whether this is normal or needs further investigation.  While it is probably nothing to worry about, I have seen instances where a breast mass was palpable after placement of an implant.  You should definitely not wait more than a couple of weeks to have it checked.

Donald Griffin, MD
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Lump after augmentation

+1
"Lump" is such a generic term that it doesn't really convey the specifics of what you've found. It could be a seroma, hematoma, normal swelling which is becoming apparent to you at this time, etc. Followup with your plastic surgeon. If you are concerned, don't wait for your next visit; call the office and schedule an appointment.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Breast Lump after Augmentation

+1

You may be feeling a normal swelling response after surgery or the implant itself. Point it out to your surgeon at your next post op visit. If it does not resolve, it may need to be evaluated.

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Ohio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.