Should I Lose Weight Before SMAS Facelift and Neck Lift?

Should I lose weight before SMAS Facelift and Submentoplasty Neck lift?  I am having a Face lift & Neck lift & Brow Lift is being covered buy Insurance. Should I loose weight before having anything done?

If I don't loose weight now and loose weight later will my new face be all saggy?

Thanks

Doctor Answers (27)

Weight Loss and SMAS Facelift

+2

For almost all cosmetic procedures it is advisable to be at a realistic body weight.  If you have a facelift performed and then you lose a significant amount of weight most likely you will redevelop laxity of the skin and supporting tissues.  


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Should I Lose Weight Before SMAS Facelift and Neck Lift?

+2

Losing weight after having a face lift will definitely contribute to more sagging of your face after the surgery. Loss of volume causes sagging whether you have a face lift or not. So I definitely recommend losing your weight before the surgery. However, the goal is to lose your weight to a level that you can comfortably maintain. If you cannot maintain the lower weight and you gain it back after surgery, you may as well proceed with the surgery and enjoy its benefits now.

The best weight loss probram is eating heathfully, meaning eliminate the simple carbohydrates and saturated fats. One effective plan is to put on your plate 2/3 vegetables (not including a potato or white rice) and 1/3 lean meat or protein. Also routine simple exercising will help, even rapid walking or using the stairs instead of the elevator. Best of luck with both your face lift and weight loss.

E. Ronald Finger, MD
Savannah Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Weight Loss & Facelift

+2

The success of weight loss before facelift is low. Also, if safely done, say 1-2 month, it  may take over a year to lose weight, of which most will likely come off the trunk and lower extremities.

I ask patients what has been their stable weight. This is the most powerful indicator of the the set point they are most likely to maintain. This often is higher after menopause.

On the bright side, a good number of my patients have lost weight after their facelift surgery, usually motivated by their improved appearance.

Edward Szachowicz, MD, PhD
Minneapolis Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

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Weight Loss Prior to Face Lift

+2

I recommend that my patients try to get within 10 lbs of their ideal weight prior to undergoing face lift surgery.  If they can do this, their result is just that much better.  I do have some patients that were unable to achieve that goal, for whatever reason, and we were still get able to obtain a good result.  Those good results may have even been better if they had been able to get closer to their ideal weight prior to surgery .

A face lift is a big investment of time and money, and I always want my patient to get the best possible surgical outcome. Ideally, folks do much better if they can get close to their ideal weight and maintain it prior to undergoing a major facial rejuvenation procedure.

Jenifer L. Henderson, MD
Silverdale Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Weight loss

+2

There are two kinds of weight loss patients in my practice. Those on a plan and those that just talk about it. If you are going to lose weight by all means wait. Yes if you lose weight afterwards you will lose some of the tightening.

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Weight loss with facelifts

+1
I do recommend that patients be close to there goal weight before surgery.  The face can change dramatically with weight loss or gain and this can diminish the results.  Patients who maintain a more constant weight after surgery will also have the added longevity of the facelift procedure over patients who yo-yo.

Michelle J. Place, MD
Danville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

If losing more than 15 to 20 pounds then lose the weight before facelift surgery

+1

Small and gradual weight loss will have minimal if any effect on facelift surgery results.

Large and rapid weight loss certainly can and should be accomplished before facelift surgery.

End of the day though weight lose should not be a big issue for facial surgery. If done properly, a facelift is more about tightening underlying muscles and if any loose skin should  reappear after weight loss or the passing of time it an be very easily addressed with a minor procedure.

Kamran Jafri, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Stable weight best for most cosmetic surgery including facelifts

+1

In general  it is best to be at your stable long term weight to reduce the probability for revision surgery. It makes little or no sense to loose or gain weight for a surgical procedure including Facelift unless you can maintain that weight for many years or it is a relatively small amount (plus or minus 5 pounds). This is because if you lose fat that is supportting your facial skin it will tend to sag especially if you don't have good skin elasticisity (most facelift patients)


 

Larry S. Nichter, MD, MS, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Facial rejuvenation and weight loss

+1

If you plan on losing more weight, then I would wait to have a facelift.  Deflation will occur and the skin may be looser.  Volume changes will occur and will have to be addressed

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Weight loss (unless massive) has little effect on a facelift.

+1

Most patients express the desire to lose a few pounds.  This will not effect the results of a facelift before or after the operation.  Excess fat under the chin is often removed as part of the operation and won't be effected by weight shifts.  Massive weight loss is a different story.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.