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Is it safe to get Botox injections to an area that has a facial implant?

Hello, My chin wrinkles up when I close my mouth and it's been bothersome for me and was interested in trying botox for my "orange peel" chin. I had a chin implant put in a little over a year ago. So, is it safe to get injectables to that area or is there a chance for complications due to the implant?

Doctor Answers (9)

Botox for the Chin

+1
There are risks with everything.  There is always the potential for introducing bacteria in or near the implant, so be sure to see someone that uses absolute sterile technique and is comfortable injecting over an implant.  The last thing you want is an infection of the implant.


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Botox near a facial implant

+1
Botox, when injected at the right depth, would be placed in the muscles around the chin and should improve the appearance of your wrinkling skin. This should have no impact on the implant.

Matheson A. Harris, MD
Salt Lake City Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Is it safe to get Botox injections to an area that has a facial implant?

+1
Yes, there is no issue with having Botox in your chin following a chin implant.  The chin implant is under the muscle and covering of the bone.  Botox is injected into the muscle.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Chin

+1
It is safe to do. The chin implant should be below the muscle. The botox is injected into the muscle itself well above the implant.

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Is it safe to get Botox injections to an area that has a facial implant?

+1
This is typically safe when your injection is performed by a physician injector who understands the chin implant procedure. The mentalis muscle that is injected sits superficial to the implant. Therefore, your injections should not in any way contact the implant.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon 

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Facial Implants and Botox

+1
Hi AWM.  The two should not conflict as the implant is on the bone and the Botox is injected into muscle that sits above the bone.  

We refer to the issue you are concerned about as a "pebble chin".  It most often occurs when the patient flexes the mentalis muscle in that area.  Most patients do not even know they do this as it is out of habit.  But a little Botox or Dysport can work wonders.

Click the link below for a nice example of before and after pictures for Dysport injections to address a pebble chin or orange peel chin.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox and Chin Implants

+1
Implants are deep on the bone and will not be effected by injecting the muscles on top.  Speak to your physician if you are concerned however.  Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Chin implant will NOT affect Botox results

+1
Botox can be very effective in treating the "orange peel" appearance of your chin.  It has to be injected superficially right in the middle of the affected area.   Having an implant should not influence the results.  Discuss your goals with your plastic surgeon.

Daniel Yamini, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Botox and chin implants

+1
Yes, it is safe to have Botox injected to the chin for the dimpling.  The implant is placed below the muscle and the Botox is injected into or above the muscle. Only if the injection is placed into the capsule formed around implant would the possibility of infection be more likely and risk the implant. 

Lee P. Laris, DO
Phoenix Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.