How Long Do I Need to Wait for Revision Tip Plasty?

Hey. I had tip plasty performed nearly a month ago. It was to raise the tip of my nose slightly because it was too long for me face and dipped a lot when I smiled which made me incredible self concious. I'd always put my hand over my face when I smiled. Now it has been done, he has not raised the tip at all. It is just a bit swollen. How long to I have to wait to get it done again? Thanks X

Doctor Answers (6)

Revision Tip Rhinoplasty

+2

As a general rule, it is best to wait at least 12 months for a revision tip rhinoplasty.  The tip of the nose has a tendency to retain swelling longer than other areas of the nose following surgery.  Furthermore, several factors (ie the surgical approach, amount of cartilage grafting performed, your skin quality, etc) can influence how long it will take to achieve a stable result.   You can take an active step in reducing your swelling by managing your diet (ie reduce your salt intake, reduce your exposure to personal food sensitivities).  Best of luck!!


Lexington Facial Plastic Surgeon

Waiting a year is best

+2

If you have had a previous rhinoplasty and are not satisfied with the appearance in the tip area, a minor revision tip rhinoplasty can be performed. Typically, however, most surgeons recommend waiting a full year to allow healing to occur. This way both the surgeon and the patient know that they are looking at a final result and that healing from the past has resolved. 

Mark Hamilton, MD
Greenwood Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

How to wait after a Tp platy to have another?

+2

 It depends on what needs to be done to the nasal tip during the next tip plasty.  There aren't any photos to evaluate but if the tip only needs to be rotated up, I have accomplished this using a columellar incision and an orthopedic suture technique as an isolated procedure.  This could be done several months after the original Rhinoplasty.  If anything more invasive is required, the standard wait period is 6 months to ensure proper healing and blood supply to the nasl tissues.  IMHO, yu should discuss this with your current Rhinoplasty surgeon first.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Must wait at least 12 months to assess issues at hand

+2

You really should wait at least 12 months to assess the true issues at hand once you are 100% done healing.

Babak Azizzadeh, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Revision tip rhinoplasty

+2

Remember that the image you're looking at in the mirror right now may well change significantly in the next several months so be patient. Revision tip rhinoplasty is usually delayed 6-12 months following the initial operation to allow all the swelling in the nasal tip skin to resolve so as to make an accurate diagnosis and successful sugical treatment plan. Revision tip plasty is usually performed through an open approach. Cartilage grafting is commonly used to provide adequate tip support and definition. Surgery on the nasal septum is often needed to shorten the nose and may have been overlooked with the initial surgery. If you want to obtain a second opinion, you might wish to see a plastic surgeon who has a lot of experience with revision rhinoplasty which is more challenging.Best of luck

Richard Chaffoo, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Tip Rhinoplasty

+2

You need to have patience, things will continue to improve with time.  I typically wait at least 6 months before even considering a rhinoplasty revision/touch up.  The nose continues to change/refine even years after surgery.  It takes along time for tip swelling to resolve.  Hang in there!!

Jenifer L. Henderson, MD
Silverdale Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.