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Best Long Term Shape After Mastopexy? (photo)

Hi, Asymmetry became more pronounced after nursing where I grew 5 cup sizes. Want more symmetry + as perky breasts as possible with what nature has left me. Happy with size, don't need upper fullness, no implants. Favourite PS says to raise fold, anchor scar as lollipop as may restretch + bottom out in time with stretched skin. Other consults favour lollipop/short transverse - all will reduce right breast. Confused! Just want nicest long term shape, less concerned re scar. Thanks for your time

Doctor Answers (11)

Best Long Term Shape After Mastopexy

+1

There is enough skin excess on the right, that I feel an anchor pattern would serve best. It can allow for removal of excess skin in both vertical and horizontal directions and both seem to me to be needed here. It may be that the horizontal incision in the fold will not be needed in the left breast.

Some reduction of the volume of the right breast will also be needed.

All the best. 


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Best mastopexy proedure

+1

Biased on your anatomy, a vertical mastopexy would give you the best result.  Even though you are not concerned about the scars plastic surgeons would still like to minimize them if you could still get a great result.  Scars are forever, so why not keep them as short as possible?

Leonard T. Yu, MD
Kahului Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

I'm Taking An Academic Approach To Choosing My Breast Lift Procedure

+1

Your question "which mastopexy will give me the best long term shape" is a good one.  You have added to this "you are less concerned about scarring and you want no implants". Putting this all together, I personally would recommend the classical anchor technique on the left with an anchor plus reduction on the right.  I routinely add 0 braided polyester sutures internally to help reshape the breast tissue.  These very much resembles Ted Lockwood's SFS sutures.  The classical anchor mastopexy allows you to equalize the two breasts and equalize the areola both in position and size.  It has a long term track record of over 100 years.   

Your question has brought out the academician in the various Real Self responders.  You have been offered as least four basic types of procedure with minor variations on each procedure depending on the surgeon's personal experience.  This must be confusing, but as I read your question, you want the best long term shape and the standard anchor procedure has the best long term track record.  But the unasked question is who should do my surgery, and the answer is a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who has done all types of procedures, who is motivated to come out with a beautiful short term and long term result, and who can evaluate the nuances of your breasts, your physiology, etc., etc.    

S. Larry Schlesinger, MD, FACS
Honolulu Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 194 reviews

The Ultimate Breast Lift provides long term lift with minimal scarring

+1

Dear Worried,

 

The Ultimate Breast Lift is a new technique that redesigns a woman's breast to reshape, lift and provide long term cosmesis. It was designed to transfer the weight of the breast off the skin envelope on to the underlying chest muscles. Unlike other techniques which place the scar at the weakest point (the weight of the breast stretches and weakens the vertical scar), the UBL does not. This makes the UBL an inherently stronger lift. Results are natural and with less scarring.

Kind regards,

Dr. H

Gary M. Horndeski, MD
Texas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

Best long term shape after mastopexy

+1

It all depends on who is doing the surgery. Ask your plastic surgeon which technique he/she uses the most for your situation. Many of the surgeons that have posted prefer an inverted T technique. I personally would use a vertical breast lift technique that does not have a horizontal component for the scar. Neither technique is wrong. I do believe that internal sutures that are used to reshape the breast mound under the skin are more likely to have a longer lasting result than a technique that is simply tightening the skin envelope. 

William T. Stoeckel, MD
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Breast lift surgery

+1

The best technique is the one that will give you the best results with the least amount of scarring.  A lollipop or an anchor type mastopexy is reasonable.  I prefer a lollipop based upon the photos you posted.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Lift surgery for breast asymmetry

+1

This not uncommon situation and the fact that there are several ways to deal with means there is no one correct or incorrect answer. I think you need anchor ( inverted T lift) of the right side. For the left you will still end up with an anchor lift with a shorter scar at the inframarmmary fold. 

Moneer Jaibaji, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Best shape!!

+1

From the posted photos I would agree with a inverted t lift and reduction of the larger breast. Very important you understand the process in detail spnyjere are no surprises. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Breast lift question

+1

Every doctor will recommend the procedure that works best in his or her hands. In my practice I would have a short anchor on the right and a shorter anchor on the left. Trust your doctor since they of course want you to have the best result!

Gregory Lynam, MD
Richmond Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Breast lift: Anchor vs Vertical scar

+1

Thank you for your pictures.  Although I cannot give medical advice without a consultation and direct examination, I am happy to provide some guidelines that should be helpful.

I appreciate your confusion.  Part of the problem in getting a good understanding of various breast lift techniques is that the external scar is only part of the picture.  What goes on underneath the scar is often more important for the stability of the long term result.

 

Most of the techniques that provide an anchor type scar give beautiful results over the short term, but sometimes lead to long term disappointment.  This is due to the fact that these procedures rely on the skin to lift the breast, and skin may stretch over time.

 

With vertical or lollipop type lifts there are a variety of techniques.  Some just tighten the skin and suffer the same disadvantages as the anchor procedure.  Other techniques rearrange the internal structure of the breast to provide longer term support.  This approach is what has worked the best for my patients

John Q. Cook, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.