How Long Will It Take Sutures to Dissolve After a Breast Reduction?

I am 5 weeks in and having a pain in my nipple. I am curious if it could be a stitch working its way out, or if it is something i should be worried about?

Doctor Answers (4)

Breast Reduction and Sutures?

+1

Thank you for the question.

Congratulations on having undergone the breast reduction surgery; it is one of the most patient pleasing operations we perform.

Dissolvable sutures may last anywhere from several weeks to approximately 8 months after surgery.

If you're having specific concerns you should follow up with your plastic surgeon to have them addressed directly. 

Best wishes.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 792 reviews

Absorbable sutures and breast reduciton

+1

This depends on the sutures used. However, generally speaking, most absorbably sutures beneath the skin rarely dissolve prior to 3 weeks and can persist as long as 6 months. Skin Sutures can absorb as fast as 5 days or longer depending on their composition.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Breast reduction sutures

+1

Breast reduction sutures usually lose stregnth within a few weeks and then dissolve over a few months time.  The pain can be many things. You should see your doctor.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

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Painful Nipple after Breast Reduction

+1

Internal stitches are NOT painful. They serve as internal splints allowing and guiding scar adherence of tissues in their new locations. The inside sutures used in Breast Reduction surgery usually dissolve and lose their strength in 6-8 weeks.

See your surgeon so he/she can determine if you have another process that could be causing discomfort such as a small fluid collection or area of fat necrosis both of which are correctable.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.