Recovery Time For Subglandular Breast Augmentation With Areola Incision?

Doctor Answers (17)

Recovery after breast surgery

+2

 

Although guidelines may vary from surgeon to surgeon, I advise my breast augmentation patients not to engage in any exercise for at least 4 weeks after surgery. This timeline includes a strict guideline of no work, school or other activities for one full week.

 

It might seem excessive to stay quiet for so long but it really is an important aspect to the healing process. Within that first week after surgery, we really want to give the body every opportunity to heal itself. Spending energy on activities outside of the healing process is only going to prolong the time required to fully recover and may even negatively impact your results. It is also very important that when you return to regular exercise that you approach the activity as if you had never been to the gym before. Listen to your body and don’t push yourself too hard or too fast.

 


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Recovery Time After a Subglandular Augmentation

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In my practice, most breast augmentation patients-be it subglandular or submuscular, are able to brisk walk after 2 to 3 days.  They may start light aerobic activity at 7-10 days, and they may return to all activities at 3 weeks.  I do ask that they start out lightly and work their way back up to full levels and not just try to start right where they had left off before their surgery.  However, each plastic surgeon has their own routine that they know works best for them and their patients.  Please discuss this with your plastic surgeon before your surgery so you can plan your recovery schedule.  Best of luck with your surgery.

Herluf G. Lund, Jr, MD
Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Recovery after Subglandular BA

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After breast augmentation, regardless of where the incision is made, I generally recommend taking a week off to reuperate. It's certainly possible to get back earlier but you run the risk of doing too much which can result in a little more prolonged discomfort and possibly post operative bleeding /hematoma. I have my patients return to non-impact cardio exercise after 3 weeks, and full exercise after 6. I do not like my patients to do any upper chest or arm weights / stretching for 6 weeks since these activities can push the implant down and outward. Having a subglandular implant could mean that you could get back to these activities a little earlier, around 4 weeks.. Hope this helps. Every Plastic surgeon has their own routine though, so ultimately you should listen to the surgeon you choose to use for your own surgery.

Ronald Schuster, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

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BBA

+1

It really depends on a few factors. Adequate pain control is likely the most important. Individual pain tolerance differs greatly. I find that women who have had children generally have less post-op pain, as they have a much higher pain tolerance. From a surgical point of view, there are several things the surgeon/anaesthesiologist can do to decrease your post-op pain.

I generally perform breast blocks prior to making any incisions with a mix of short- and long-acting local anaesthetics. I have found this greatly reduces post-op pain. I also encourage patients to take the prescribed pain killers regularly every 4 hours especially for the first 24-48 hours. If you don't stay on top of the pain in the immediate post-operative period, it is extremely difficult to "catch-up". Most of my patients experience very little post-op pain after breast augmentation.

Of course, the type of augmentation you have will also determine your post-operative discomfort. Larger implants, and subpectoral implant placement will also increase post-op discomfort. This doesn't mean you shouldn't get large implants, or place them under the muscle - you simply need to know what to expect. Many women also experience difficulty with sleeping in the first few weeks after augmentation due to the weight of the implants on their chest. This is more significant in back-sleepers.

To answer your question about time off work, my experience has been that there is a huge range. I have patients that go back to work the next day (against my advice), and I have had patients take as much as 2 weeks off of work. It really depends on what you do for work, and how you feel. As for taking care of your kids, if your implant is placed under the muscle, it will be a few weeks before you feel comfortable enough to pick them up.

As for scars, I tell patients it will take a year to see the absolute final result. Practically, however, by 3-6 months the scar will be very close to the final result. I suggest 3M paper taping, and have a specific scar massage protocol I use to help speed scar resolution.

I hope this helps. Good luck!

Sincerely,

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Recovery time after Sub-glandular breast augmentation is typically 4-5 days.

+1

Thank you for your question. Recovery following Sub-glandular breast augmentation is typically easier and shorter than after sub-muscular breast augmentation.

Most patients after Sub-glandular breast augmentation will be comfortable by day 4 or 5 but I recommend not returning to work until a week.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Breast implant

+1
Usually sub glandular implantation heals quicker than sub muscular implantation.most of our patients get back to work in a week time.

Sanjay Parashar, MD
Dubai Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Subglandular Breast Augmentation Recovery Time

+1

Hi,

 

Every patient is different when it comes to recovery time but subglandular breast augmentation tend to have a shorter recovery time than the submuscular one.

 

Usually, the recovery process works its way smoothly and through stages reaching the one month mark where several physical activities could be resumed pretty well with the exception of heavy lifting that I do not recommend unless a full recovery is attained.

 

Hope this helps.

Thank you for your inquiry and best of luck.

Dr. Sajjadian

Ali Sajjadian, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 120 reviews

Recovery Time For Subglandular Breast Augmentation With Areola Incision

+1

Hello and thanks for the question.

 

I recommend you follow-up with your elected surgeon to discuss his or her post-operative recovery routine for breast augmentation surgery. At our institution, we recommend refraining from lifting anything greater than 10 lbs for a period of 4 weeks.  Modest lower body exercise may be ensued at 2 weeks and upper body workout restrictions are placed for 4 weeks. In general, most people return to work at a weeks time, but recovery courses will vary from person to person.

 

Best of luck,

 

Glenn Vallecillos, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Glenn Vallecillos, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Recovery after sub glandular breast augmentation

+1

Generally speaking recovery after sub glandular augmentation is straightforward. I advise my patients to wear a sports bra for about 6 weeks. Return to work in about in about 6-7 day depending on their occupation and recovery. Return to full activity after 6-8 weeks. I also advise you to follow up with your plastic surgeon and follow his/her instructions. Each surgeon has their own post operative regiment and you have to adhere to the instructions of your surgeon.

Moneer Jaibaji, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Subglandular implant and periareola incision recovery

+1

Each patient will heal differently, but in most cases patient can go back to light duty( desk work) within the week.  It takes a few more weeks to go back to light exercise.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.