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How Long Should I Expect a CEREC Crown to Hold Up over the Years if I Grind my Teeth?

Can a CEREC crown last for 20-30 years, if I grind my teeth at night while I sleep? What factors reduce the lifetime of a CEREC crown?

Doctor Answers (7)

Nightguard Recommended to preserve dental restorations

+1

To protect dental work of any kind and your own natural teeth a night guard is highly recommended. These days the night guards can be made really small and comfortable, those are called NTI.  I would highly recommend to ask your dentist if he can make you one. It's a worthwhile investment. Good Luck!


Manhattan Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Grinding Teeth Means More Questions

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Please don't assume that grinding your teeth is normal or inconsequential.  It could be a sign of much more significant problems and the lifespan of a CEREC or another crown may be only a tiny important part.  Cerec is not a magic solution - keep in mind there is a reason why you need a crown in the first place and until that reason is addressed, you are only patching up the problem.

So, you may be asking the right question, but not the most important one.

Steve Carstensen, DDS
Bellevue Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Lifespan of a crown if tooth grinding is present.

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If you are grinding you're teeth you're CEREC crown may not last a week. The literature shows us that a typical crown will last about 7-15 years. The most common reasons of failure are decay under the margins, need for endodontic treatment, fracture of crown material and factor of tooth among others. Grinding or severe clenching may exacerbate failure of the restoration. There are many good materials crowns are made of, from full gold/titanium to full porcelain, and a myriad of combinations in between. Therefore the prudent question to ask is not what material to use but rather what to do about the grinding.

Dan Hagi, DDS
Toronto Cosmetic Dentist

Cerec crown longevity

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Any crown can last from 1 to 30 years. They fail mostly due to decay underneath, not so much due to wear or fracture. Use a night gard if you are a grinder.

Mitchell A. Josephs, DDS
Palm Beach Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

How long should your crown last.

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Not to respond with a cliche' but the life span of a crown is determined by a number of factors. Most factors are not in the hands of the doctor or the type of material placed in the mouth. If you are only concerned with the grinding aspect. The grinding should be managed or corrected. This change will not only alter the life span of the crown it will also alter the life span of your teeth and the surrounding tissues. The muscles of the jaw and the joints that are associated with the oral cavity exert a tremendous amount of force. This energy and force used in the wrong fashion can cause irreversible damage. Please request a complete work up before any restorations are placed.

Dr. C

Roderick Cooper, DDS
Atlanta Cosmetic Dentist

Life time of an all ceramic restoration

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There are a few questions that need to be addressed

1. is the cerec an emax block

2. what tooth was restored, molar? premolar? canine?

3. do you wear an appliance to manage your bruxism or clenching?

4. do you clench or grind during the day?

5. what was the reason the tooth recieved a crown? decay? old filling? crack in tooth?

6. was the crown cemented or bonded?

7. was the preperation in enamel or dentin?

8. has the tooth had endondontic therapy?

WIth all of these variables, expected life expectancy of crowns vary dramatically. most insurace companies will cover a new crown every 5 yrs approx??? so the 20-30 yr mark may be an unrealistic expectation. If you want the most bang for your buck then a full gold restoration is hard to beat!! hope this helps

 

J. Willis Baker, DDS
Wichita Cosmetic Dentist

Cerec Crown Longevity

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A Cerec crown like all restorative dentistry is impacted by factors that vary from patient to patient. While grinding will affect the duration the crown will last, it is more important to address the reason the crown was needed in the first place. Decay occurring at the base of the crown is the most common reason that crowns fail. If the crown was originally needed because of a large cavity in the tooth, or a cavity that formed around an existing filling, addressing the factors that contribute to decay will be as important as interventions to modify your grinding.

Richard Champagne, DMD
Freehold Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.