How Long After Breast Augmentation Can I Go for Explantation?

I am 26 y/o asian female, 4'10 3/4'', 115lbs. I recently had breast augmentation done on 12/9/2010. The surgeon did a great job and they look amazing even though they have not settle down. I am post op day #4. I have been having upper back pain I assume that my body is not use to it from 34A to 34C (325cc bilaterally gummy bear). I feel them and they are pretty firm right now and high. Strangely every time I touch one particular part of my R breast I feel a sharp pain under my R scapula (Shoulder blade). I can not reproduce the same symptom on the left side. My friends think that I am having a buyer's remorse but I really don't feel comfortable with them at all. When I am laying in bed I feel like someone is sitting on my chest and its hard to breathe. my concern is how long do I need to recover before removing them?

Doctor Answers (23)

Buyer's remorse

+3

It is not unusual for some patients to have a general dysphoria or depressed mood after surgical procedures.  I have seen this occur several times and these patients improve over a few weeks and then generally love their new bodies. However, this is not the case for everyone.  If you feel that you made a bad decision in having your surgery, then you would be better off taking the implants out sooner rather than waiting too long for a capsule to form or for the skin to stretch too much. 

If you are sure you want them out, you can have this done under anesthesia and your skin will likely shrink back down over time, but this depends on your skin quality, size, age, and how long the implants have been in place.  Hope this helps.


Jacksonville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

After a breast augmentation, give yourself 6 to 12 months to recover!

+2

A breast augmentation is an incredible procedure and is usually a wonderful experience for most women.  Congratulations! 

However, like any body-modifying surgery and major operation, it takes TIME for the body to recover, to heal, all swelling to go away, and for your body image to adjust.  

During the period immediately following surgery, I counsel my patients (and their families or caregivers that will be helping them after surgery) that they may undergo feelings of weepiness, regret, discomfort and feel quite "out of sorts" for a few days up to a few weeks. 

This is entirely normal, and they should not be too distressed if they are feeling this way! 

Just like a very drastic haircut, changing your body in a number of hours will have a dramatic effect on you.  Give both your body and your mind the time it needs to recover.  This takes usually 6-12 months at least. 

At postoperative day (POD) 4, you have no idea what your final result is going to be like, and are likely experiencing the maximal physical discomfort that you will undergo.  Be patient.  You will probably love your result!

Give yourself the downtime and support you need during this early postoperative period.  This means lots of caring and assistance (physical and emotional) from family and friends, rest, good nutrition, and a laugh or two! 

I do have experience removing implants in women who have "given it a go" for at least 1-2 years, and have make the definite decision that they no longer want them.  However, they are in a very different situation to you, and have lived with the implants for a long time before deciding to remove them.

Karen M. Horton, MD, MSc, FRCSC

Karen M. Horton, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Implant removal breast tenderness firmness

+2

If you are truly unhappy, then removal is always an option.

While there is no particular time for removal of an implant,from what you are describing,it seems too early to consider removal as your only days after surgery. 

Generally, each of the issues you have raised will improve over time.  At the very least you should discuss your concerns with your surgeon. 

Fredrick A. Valauri, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon

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When can breast implants be removed after surgery...

+2

I would wait at least three months after breast augmentation until you evaluate whether or not to take them out.  It is completely normal to have different pains both in the back and chest after surgery, and they can be more on one side than another.  It is also normal to be nervous about your results.  As time goes by, the implants will settle and the pains will diminish and most likely you will be happy.  Just give it some time.  After three months, you will be in a better position to decide if any changes are needed.  Be sure to discuss your feelings with your surgeon. 

Shain A. Cuber, MD
Edison Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Removing implants

+2

There is no set time to have implants removed.  You can have them removed al most anytime.  But, in most cases, patients have what you describe as "buyers remorse" because of the discomfort and usually this gets better with time.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Recover First, Don't be Hasty

+2

You owe it to yourself to give yourself a bit more time to heal. It is normal for many people to question the wisdom of their decision during this early, still stressful time after surgery.

Give your body time to heal and your head time to clear. You'll probably be feeling much better within just a few days.

Paul C. Zwiebel, MD
Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Recommended to Wait At Least 3-6 Months For Implant Removal Following Breast Augmentation

+1

                  It’s not unusual for breast augmentation patients to experience considerable pain and discomfort in the immediate post-operative period. For this reason patients often second guess their decision to have breast augmentation and end up having the equivalent of buyer’s remorse.  In many ways this is a normal phenomenon.  The reason people have cosmetic surgery is to look and feel better about themselves.  In the immediate post-operative period, the opposite sometimes occurs because of bruising and swelling.

                  This can make patients anxious and cause them to question their original decision.  It’s not unusual for them to feel that their implants are too large or that it’s not really what they had wanted.  Under these circumstances they frequently request implant removal.

                  Fortunately after a period of adjustment the vast majority of patients are extremely happy with their results.  For this reason we recommend that patients wait at least 3-6 months before removing implants.  Although implants can theoretically be removed at any time following breast augmentation surgery, we feel that this delay is appropriate. 

                  If you’re considering implant removal four days after breast augmentation, it’s important that a lengthy discussion occur with your plastic surgeon.  In most cases it’s appropriate to delay removal until the dust has settled.  During this time, patients frequently adjust to their new implants and become satisfied with their result.  

Richard J. Bruneteau, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 73 reviews

Reasons to remove breast implants after surgery

+1

One can undergo immediate breast implant removal. I would recommend you wait a few weeks to determine whether the pain and discomfort is only postsurgical pain. 

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Breast Implant Removal Timing?

+1

Thank you for the question.

I will suggest that you wait at least 3 months before making any decisions.  Communicate your concerns clearly with your plastic surgeon.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 680 reviews

Removing breast implants

+1

It's only been about 4 months since your surgery, so I would wait about 2-3 more months to let all of the swelling resolve before removing your implants.  Then, you'll probably be okay removing them if you're still not happy.

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD, FACS
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.