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Belotero and Pain Relief?

I have tear troughs which I hate. Belotero seems like a good option based on info I've read here and elsewhere. However, I can't have lidocaine (adrenaline/epi is the problem) due to a health issue - e.g.my dentist can only use Citanest. Belotero is not premixed with lidocaine at present but topical lidocaine seems to be required to reduce the pain of the filler injection. I'm not sure I can have that. Are there alternatives for pain relief or would it be bearable without or just ice packs?

Doctor Answers (3)

Belotero and pain relief

+2

It is definitely possible to have Belotero injections without requiring lidocaine, including topical lidocaine.  The needle normally used is very small and most people can tolerate the injection without anesthetic.  You should just mention to your treating physician about your lidocaine issue and it should be fine.


San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Belotero and pain relief?

+1

Belotero does not contain lidocaine so it should be safe for you. If topical anesthetic is not possible, you may use ice prior to the injections. Most people can tolerate the injections without much discomfort since the needle is small and the product is very soft. 

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

Belotero without topical Lidocaine

+1

Injecting Belotero without the use of topical lidocaine has been done before and is definitely feasible.  Utilizing ice packs can help take the edge off and many of my patients find injections around the tear trough area very tolerable- even more so than around the mouth. Be sure to let your injector know about your problem with lidocaine.

Ritu Saini, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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