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My Nose is Flat and Wide, Would Laser Work? (photo)

Saw plastic surgeon. he said that nose is wide and flat as you can see from the photos .said that the problem is not on the inside because he looked at it and said that cartilages are not split.said if he did rhinoplasty then there wouldn’t be difference cos that would be on the inside and problem is on the outside cos too much fat on nose he said I would be wasting my money. He told me to get laser surgery on nose and that will remove the excess fat and my nose would improve.would that work?

Doctor Answers (11)

Laser Will Not Help Flat Wide Nose

+5

Thank you for your question. Laser resurfacing can tighten skin but it will not change the shape of your nose.

A Rhinoplasty is needed to improve a flat wide nose. The structures underneath the skin that shape the nose must be modified.


Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Laser for Flat, Wide Nose

+2

The contour and position of the underlying cartilage and bone will not be changed with laser surgery. However the results of rhinoplasty surgery can be improved with treatment of the thick skin using a laser or a regimen of skin care and chemical peels. Consult with rhinoplasty specialists.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Rhinoplasty with Laser

+2

All noses typically have bone and cartilage constituting the framework. Some individuals may have a thicker, fatty layer under their skin. However this does not stop them from getting great results with a Rhinoplasty, as long as their surgeon has prepared them for reasonable expectations. See several surgeons who have experience in Rhinoplasty before making any final decision. From what I can see a Rhinoplasty procedure would be expected to narrow the nose, better define and project the tip of the nose and to refine the nose in all dimensions. Best of Luck  Dr Harrell

Jon F. Harrell, DO
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

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Lasers and rhinoplasty

+1

Rhinoplasty involves reshaping the nose by changing the underlying structures such as bone and cartilage. Very little can be done to the thickness of skin. Lasers only have a role in special cases of disease process involving the nasal skin such as rhinophyma.Your pictures are very blurred but you do not appear to need laser treatments. Contact a board certified plastic surgeon in your area regarding limitations of rhinoplasty in cases of thick skin.

Shahriar Mabourakh, MD, FACS
Sacramento Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

My Nose is Flat and Wide, Would Laser Work?

+1

 Laser affects the thickness of skin only and will have zero impact on wide nasal cartilages and bones.  These require Rhinoplasty to shape and refine their size and shape.  Hope this helps.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Wide fleshy noses can be made smaller and more shapely, but not with laser

+1

The way we make large fleshy noses appear smaller is the opposite of how we make noses with thin skin and strong cartilages smaller. For fleshy noses, the cartilages are usually thin and weak. Adding cartilage grafts (from your own nose) as well as removing some of the fat or fleshy tissue under the skin will make your nose look smaller.

Lasers only treat the surface of the skin and are great for winkles or pigment but won't shrink a nose.
 

Find a rhinoplasty specialist near you to discuss how to make your nose more shapely.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Laser treatments on your nose would not be a substitute for well-performed Rhinoplasty Surgery.

+1

I read your concerns and reviewed your photos which are limited for evaluation.

You appear to have a wide nose, as you describe, but your oblique photos appear to show a bump which is not typical with a "flat" nose. Your thick skin may or may not be limiting, and an in-person consultation would be required. Given your olive skin color, I'm not sure what type of laser treatments your surgeon is recommending. If a prospective rhinoplasty patient has significant acne or inflammation involving their nose, I may suggest consultation with a dermatologist to control the acne and inflammation. I have not had the opportunity to refer any of my ethnic patients for laser treatments before nose job surgery.

You may want to check abfprs.org to find local certified rhinoplasty specialists for a fresh second opinion.

Hope this helps.

Dr. Joseph

Eric M. Joseph, MD
West Orange Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 278 reviews

Rhinoplasty for flat wide nose.

+1

Rhinoplasty with removal of excess fat below the skin is what you need not a laser. 

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Get a second opinion

+1

The major factors in nose surgery are the framework of the bones and the cartilage.  Thick skin and/or excess soft tissue or fat can affect the overall framework, but you need to address that first.  I would seek other opinions since you may be surprised by the answers or approaches to your problem.  I would have the surgery with the person you feel most comfortable with and listens to you carefully.

Tito Vasquez, MD, FACS
Southport Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Rhinoplasty and lasers

+1

I suggest getting another opinion with a board-certified surgeon who has extensive experience with rhinoplasty.  You should be able to get a very nice result with a rhinoplasty, despite the thickness of your skin.  You may have slightly prolonged swelling, and the more subtle results with be less visible, but nonetheless a dramatic change could be achieved with surgery.  Lasers will not change the bone or cartilage.  Good luck, /nsn.

Nina S. Naidu, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.