Can an Inverted V Worsen Even More? to the Point of Complete Collapse and Become Very Noticeable to Others?

I am two years post a small revision. And i can start to notice a line going across my nose, and can feel the cartilage running down the side of my nose. It has been two years and now i am depressed to the point where i am missing out university because i am fearing the fact that my nose will look worst and worst and i will have to go through another operation. I want this to be over. Others can not notice at this point. Please help as i am totally depressed by this. Should my swelling be gone by now

Doctor Answers (8)

Worsening of inverted-V deformity

+1

After two years you may not notice much worsening of your valve collapse. It is possible to repair if the narrowing is problemmatic but that is up to you.

Spreader grafts can be used to fix an inverted-V deformity. You can read more about spreader graft surgery at my web reference link below.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

revision rhinoplasty for inverted V deformity

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 An inverted V deformity will not getting better 2 years after a rhinoplasty.  The inverted V deformity is best treated with a combination of bilateral spreader grafts and sometimes osteotomies. This is usually as straightforward revision rhinoplasty repair performed as an outpatient procedure.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

2 years after revision rhinoplasty, you see mostly what you will get

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Inverted V deformity is from loss of support of the middle third of the nose called the internal nasal valve or middle vault. Sometimes it looks better after revision surgery for a year or so because of swelling. But if its there after 2 years is is unlikely to go away. On another note, is is unlikely to get much worse. THe idea of more surgery is not necessarily a happy one, but this is treatable.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

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Inverted V 2 Years after Rhinoplasty

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Observing my rhinoplasty results for over 25 years I feel your nose will change little in the near future. If others don't notice the depression move on with your university plans.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Inverted V and swelling

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At two years out your swelling should be gone.  An inverted V deformity will not get better.  Revision will be needed for an inverted V if it bothers you.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Inverted V Deformity

+1

At 2 years out, it is likely that all the swelling has settled. If you provide a high quality photograph of your nose and face it would help in providing you with a more accurate assessment.

John M. Hilinski, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
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The Inverted V

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The Inverted V deformity occurs when the cartilage parts of the nose pull away from the nasal bones.  This allows you to see the nasal bones in relief through the skin, which looks like an upside-down V.  

Typically the Inverted V deformity gets worse to a point, and then stops.  It would be very unusual for your deformity to get severely worse over a period of years.

The treatment often requires an additional procedure to camouflage the defect.  This need not be a large surgery.  However, revision rhinoplasty surgery should always be done by an experienced surgeon.

Andrew Winkler, MD
Lone Tree Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Inverted V Deformity

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    If you are concerned about the inverted V deformity and possible collapse, you should really visit your last surgeon or find a new one.  Pictures would be helpful to assess your concerns.  There really should not be any changes at 2 years.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.