Liposuction and PCOS

Hi, i have PCOS and as some may know i find it hard to lose weight. Even with strict diet and exercise. I lose about 2lbs and then stay the same for years! I exercise regulary and i do not eat chocolate, fizzy drinks etc etc. I have a good diet that the hospital made me follow. Which has not been a big help. So what i am asking is am i able to have liposuction. I'm 5ft7' and 90KG. Bmi i think is about 31? Am i and should i have this done. As i have really big hips compared to my top half ( 43 inch hips, and 34" waist) Thanks

Doctor Answers (5)

PCOS and liposuction

+2

Hello AlyD,

Thank you for your question regarding liposuction.  As previously indicated, liposuction is a poor substitute for weight loss for many reasons.  It is an invasive procedure that can create severe irregularities and permanent disruption of normal skin attachment elements (the stuff that holds your skin to your body) when performed to an extreme level.  Just as problematic is that liposuction would need to be performed virtually 'everywhere' on the body in individuals looking for weight loss, so that proper proportion and distribution of remaining fat would be appropriate.

Having said that, I have found an excellent role for liposuction in heavier individuals who are looking for improved proportions.  Here in lies the real strength of liposuction for everyone: the ability to permanently improve disproportionate fat distribution, i.e. creating better looking curves.

Looking at your height, weight, and waste and hip circumference, I am struck by two things: you sound as though you carry more weight below the waist, and you are heavier than I would guess by your measurements, giving you a higher than predicted BMI.  there is a possibility that you could be a good candidate for this type of liposuction, where possibly 'only' 7 to 10 pounds of body weight would be removed.

Regarding your PCOS and diet and exercise, I think that it is important for your overall medical health as well as your appearance that you loose some your weight and most importantly, become leaner.  Because of your PCOS, you are in a hyper estrogenic state (think super female) that make it hard to become lean (think body builder).

I am very dubious of any diet or exercise program provided by your hospital.  In general, organized medicine and governmental bodies associated with health have been either outright wrong or way behind in prescribing truly helpful diet and exercise advice.   If you are being told to eat lots of fruits, grains, dairy, and lower your fat consumption, you are on a very wrong path to getting lean. 

Women, and men too, who are interested in getting lean should take a page from the dieting book of body builders.  Yes, I understand that you actually may be making 'too much' male-like hormones in your ovaries, but this will not make it worse.  There are many important aspects to eating like a body builder, but it can be summed up by saying, high protein, low carb/low glycemic index, multiple small meals. 

There is so much more that can be said about dieting more effectively, and exercise too.  Additionally, liposuction may be a great way to improve your proportions as well.  I would be happy to discuss further at your convenience.

I wish you the best of luck getting healthy and getting the body you want!


Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Liposuction

+1

Liposuction is not a substitute for good diet and exercise.  It is best for areas of fatty deposits that are stubborn to go away with diet and exercise.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Liposuction in polycystic ovary disease

+1

If you have a localized pocket of fat, then regardless of teh polycystic ovary disease, you might undergo liposuction for that one area, but not for a widespread reduction of fat.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

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Liposuction For Body Contouring, Not Weight Loss

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Liposuction in its various forms ( ultrasonic, laser, smart, etc.) is designed to remove fat and contour certain areas.  It is not a weight loss tool.  Certainly a patient loses some weight from the procedure, but not nearly what most women expect.  The average amount of fat removed per patient is about 600-1000ml, which only means 1-2 pounds.  The goal is to contour areas so they appear better, while the weight loss is secondary.  I hope this helps.

Christopher V. Pelletiere, MD
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Liposuction and obesity

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Sorry for your PCOS but liposuction isn't done to treat obesity regardless of why you have it.  It just isn't worth the expense and risk wen there is too much fat to get a good result.

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.