Does Decreasing Fat Through Liposuction Mean Visceral Fat Will Be Lost With Exercise BC It's All That's Left?

I see the other postings about how liposuction doesn't get at the fat closest to the organs. By reducing the amount of fat under the skin, won't weight loss from future exercising come from that fat closest to the organs? So, although the liposcution won't directly get at the fat impacting diabetes, it should improve the impact of exercising and proper nutrition? Am i thinking about this correctly?

Doctor Answers (5)

Liposuction will not change your "biology"

+2

We are learning more and more about the biology of fat all the time. Our current thinking is that fat is a very active tissue that produces numerous hormones and chemicals that influence the entire body. The deeper fat (visceral fat around your organs) can only be modified by optimizing your exercise and nutrition. If your lifestyle was not resulting in a steady net reduction in your percentage of body fat before you had liposuction, then it is unlikely that you will see any new losses now. Therefore, for most patients that are leading a healthy lifestyle already, having liposuction will only result in losses to the fat in the areas treated.

It has been observed that patients who have liposuction of their belly superficial fat sometimes developed improved insulin sensitivity. This is really only a measurable factor for patients who are pre-diabetic or those that are already insulin dependent. Another less common observation is a slight increase in bust size after abdominal liposuction. It is theorized that all abdominal fat influences estrogen metabolism and even a slight reduction in these hormonally active fat cells can result in changes to hormonal sensitive areas elsewhere in the body. Other interesting effects on blood triglyceride levels have been observed as well.

All the best,

Dr. Mosher


Vancouver Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Liposuction and Visceral Fat Loss?

+2

Thank you for the thought provoking question.

Although your  line of reasoning makes sense, I do not know of any science that shows that patients who have had liposuction experience  the benefits you described after weight loss/exercising. In other words I know of no proof that previous liposuction “improves impact of exercising and proper nutrition”. However, if you come across any scientific study that does show this I would be  very interested.  I am sure that  there remains a lot to be learned in this area.

Thank you again for the interesting question.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 791 reviews

Visceral fat will not improve because you have had liposuction of subcutaneous fat.

+1

Consider seeing a personal trainer, a nutrition specialist and possibly having your hormones regulated.  This approach may be more successful for helping reduce visceral fat.   Liposuction will only help the fat that is outside of the muscles accessible to the liposuction procedure.

Mark Taylor, MD
Salt Lake City Dermatologic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

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Liposuction can reduce the fat on the abdomen and waist

+1

leaving you room to lose the visceral fat through diet and exercise.  There have been studies to show that it can also help patients with diabetes.  My patients who maintain a healthy diet and exercise program do very well after liposuction and are thrilled with their results.  Best to you.

Carolyn Jacob, MD
Chicago Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Fat reduction with liposuction

+1

Arguments have been made that the fat reduction with liposuction may help control diabetes, reduce appetite, help control weight, or help with fat distribution, however there is no sound evidence that any are true. Will you lose visceral fat because liposuction has removed subcutaneous fat, again simply no evidence. Would be nice though.

Best of luck, peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.