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Lifting Mouth Area with a "Sling" Lift?

I had a necklift 3 years ago, in which the dr. pulled skin horizontally on jawline, making it so tight that my facial skin was pulled hard downward for weeks. After that my mouth turned down. Then I had 2 facelifts from a dr. who, in the first lift, actually anchored my face downward, then in the second, did do lifting, but my mouth area is still too low, and mouth is turned down. I have now talked with a dr. who says he may be able to do a "Sling lift." Do you know what that is?

Doctor Answers (7)

Facelift

+2

Your experience with your previous facelifts is unfortunate.  A "sling lift" is something I perform to help patients who have a downturned mouth, as seen in facial paralysis patients, for example.  As this is now your third surgery in this area, the surgery will be more delicate.  Please choose a surgeon who is a specialist.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Sling Lift? Hmmmmmm.

+1
After reading your surgical history, I recommend that you get another opinion.  The concept of "facial slings" is usually reserved for patients with facial nerve paralysis.  This scenario doesn't sound straightforward.  My knee jerk reaction is to be cautious about more surgery at this time.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Sling Lift Procedure

+1

A sling lift is a proceedure to elevate the corner of the mouth either by using the patients own facia as a sling or using a permanent suture. If you go to a surgeon with great experience in this proceedure you may get some improvement.

Richard Galitz, MD, FACS
Miami Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Down turned mouth

+1

In your original "neck lift" procedure you likely had a Feldman or corset midline platysmaplasty which tighten the neck but can definitely pull the jowels and the corners of the mouth down if the tissue is not released and there is no concurrent SMAS or midface lift. The options for the down turned corner of the mouth in such a situation is to release the midline platysma high in the neck, cut the DAO muscles (don't recommend), Botox the DAO muscle, soft tissue fillers to elevate the corners, or midface lift. I believe that a "sling lift" will give you an unnatural appearance and I only perform it in facial paralysis patients for functional improvement.

Edwin Ishoo, MD
Brookline Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Botox and fillers to Lift lateral Mouth Area

+1

I would try Botox in the depressor muscles and fillers to improve the inferior hollowed areas. It has worked very well in my patients.

Mohsen Tavoussi, MD, DO
Huntington Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Not sure what surgeon means by sling lift

+1

I have performed Face Lifts for over 20 years and these marrionette lines (downturned mouth) are difficult to keep tight and uplifted no matter what technique is used during the Face Lift.  The sling may be alloderm, goretex or some other material that's used to anchor lower tissues and pull them upward.  All, of these anchor methods, have issues with fixation, weakening, foreign body inflammation and others that make them inappropriate for Facial rejuvenation, IMHO.  You may want to get a second opinion before having a sling procedure that may set you up for yet another Face Lift in the near future to revise the sling.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Down-turned corners of mouth after facelift

+1

You should be very careful in subjecting yourself to so much facial surgery over such a short time, or of putting homespun mechanical explanations on the surgical techniques you have received.

My advice is to give it a rest for a while, though you might consider the injection of fillers to eliminate marionette lines and elevate the corners of your mouth.

J. Brian Boyd, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

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