Should I Have a Lift at the Time of Overfill Explant, or Wait Six Months?

I had silicone implants, 600cc (Jun 2010) replaced with overfill saline implants in Jan 2012. I had 1200cc, DDD bra cup size. I was originally a B cup size. I wish to have my implants removed and NOT replaced. Will I need a mastopexy, being that I went so large? Should I wait six moths after removal to decide (allowing the breast tissue to settle), or have it done at the time of explant? Which way is more cost effective? I am 30, with pretty good skin. Thank you.

Doctor Answers (5)

Breast Implant Removal and Mastopexy?

+1

Thank you for your question. I would have it done at the time of removal and save on surgery expense, and another surgery. Heal one time, not two. I would guess you will need a mastopexy as going from 1200 to nothing will leave a bit of a void and skin retraction alone will be inadequate. See a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon to do this as you want to have as much nipple sparing care done with the mastopexy. There are some surgeons still removing the nipple routinely for the mastopexy and full sensation is lost, and sometimes the entire graft. We see these complications far more often than we would like.  I hope this helps.


Danville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Should I Have a Lift at the Time of Overfill Explant, or Wait Six Months?

+1

      With such large implants, removing the implants and waiting 6 months seems like the best idea to assure the most predictable result.  Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of breast lifts each year.  Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 209 reviews

Removal with or without mastopexy?

+1

You have had very large implants for quite some time. For that reason it is almost certain that you will need a lift. Doing a lift at the same time will be more cost-effective but probably not wise from a medical point of view. It will be difficult to assess your skin elasticity intra-operatively and your outcome may not be as good as it could have been. I would suggest that you let everything settle for 6-12 months and then decide if you need lifting.

Diana L. Elias MD

Diana L. Elias, MD
Saint Petersburg Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Should I Have a Lift at the Time of Overfill Explant, or Wait Six Months?

+1

Chances are, you will need a lift. But with removal of such large implants I don't know how a surgeon could know how much is really excess, and the chance of needing a second lift would be high.

I would favor simple removal, and regroup in 6 months.  At that time, you and your surgeon can review all options, and no bridges will have been burned. 

All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Options after Removal of Extra-large Breast Implants?

+1

Thank you for the question.

 Despite good intentions, online consultants will not be able to provide you with a precise enough answer without direct examination or, at least, viewing pictures. Consider submitting pictures or, better yet, in-person examination. As you know, considerations include size of breast implants, skin elasticity present, concerns about scarring, and overall goals ( and psychosocial situation…).

 You are wise in considering the pros/cons as well as a potential risk/complications associated with the different surgical options available. These considerations, should take priority over the cost-effectiveness considerations.

 Will look for another post with pictures if you so choose.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 726 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.