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I Can Hear a Swish Sound when I Move my Abdomen or Readjust my Cg, is This Normal? Should I Be Contacting a Doctor?

Abdomen is swollen as expected, but I can actually hear a liquid sound when I readjust my cg. My PS doesn't use drains, so I do t have drains. Also, my vaginal lips had swollen so tight that it actually broke open a little and has been draining fluid.

Doctor Answers (8)

Swishing after TT

+3

YES!!!!

 

You by definition have a seroma unless otherwise proven.  You hear swishing because there is fluid.  That explains why you are swollen.  Ask your ps if he believes in drains now (oops, snarky comment, sorry).  Hopefully, this can be treated by needle aspiration.

sek


Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Liposuction

+1

If you hear sloshing, or feel a fluid shift, then you need to call your surgeon now. This may be a seroma, and if so , needs to be drained for normal healing to occur.

Gregory Sexton, MD
Columbia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Sound like a seroma to me.

+1

This sounds exactly like a seroma which is a collection of fluid under the skin.  Small seromas usually resolve on their own but this sounds substantial and you should see your surgeon ASAP for evaluation and likely drainage.

As for your labia - och!  You should consider buying a donut cushion to sit on.  It will help the labial swelling and discomfort.  I have all my labiaplasty patients use one for a few weeks post op. 

Good luck!

Lisa L. Sowder, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

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Fluid collection

+1

Yes - your suspicions are correct, this needs medical attention.  The most likely issue is that of a seroma - where you have a "puddle" of blister fluid under the skin.  This can be easily treated in the office.  Call your surgeon today.

Thomas Fiala, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Swishing Sound after Liposuction

+1

     If there is suspicion of fluid collection, you should see your plastic surgeon to have the area drained.  The presence of a large or prolonged fluid collection can dramatically alter contours after liposuction and make your results less than optimal.  Continue compression garment afterwards and closely follow with your plastic surgeon.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Contact your surgeon for concerns

+1

From the sounds of things, you may have a fluid collection or seroma, and your surgeon will certainly want to see and evaluate you.  It's not anything to panic about and can likely be easily treated, but you should certainly give your surgeon a call and make a followup appointment.

Adam David Lowenstein, MD, FACS
Santa Barbara Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Seroma??

+1

 Certainly sounds like a seroma. Please get back to your surgeon expeditiously for diagnosis and treatment. The longer these things are present the harder the are ti get ride of in the future. Best,

 

Gary R Culbertson, MD, FACS

Gary R. Culbertson, MD
Columbia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Do I have a seroma after liposuction

+1

From the description of a swishing sound and a release of fluid, I would say that there is a very good chance that you have a seroma (or fluid build up) at the surgical site.  

 

With any body contouring procedure, there is always the chance of developing a seroma and treatment is usually very straightforward if the seroma is diagnosed and treated early.  Your surgeon will most likely drain this fluid collection in the office and then have you come back in a few times after that to make sure that the fluid has not re-accumulated.  Again, if this is treated early there should be very few long-term issues.  

 

I hope that helps!

Gregory A. Buford, MD, FACS
Denver Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.