Left Side of my Face is Paralyzed? (photo)

When I was 10 years old( Im 18 now) I fell down while doing front flips. My left side of the face became paralyzed. I didnt know there could be a surgery for that until now that I've researched. I live in Texas and I would love to know if there is still hope that I can gain movement again.

Doctor Answers (2)

There are many options for reconstruction of facial nerve paralysis

+1

Kiara, thank you for your question.  Facial nerve paralysis can be a devistating problem that can be isolating and emotionally damaging.  We take for granted our ability to use our facial muscles to communicate our emotions, and to help portray ourselves to others as we perceive ourselves.  There are many surgeons accross the country that have experience in "rehabilitation of the paralyzed facial nerve".  There are both STATIC procedures (procedures that will not help you move your face, but that will help restore symmetry of your left and right face at rest), and DYNAMIC procedures (procedures that can help restore movement to the paralyzed side of the face) that are commonly performed.  I can't say from the limited information in your question if you would be a candidate for such dynamic procedures, but it is possible.  I would suggest seaking out a plastic surgeon, or facial plastic surgeon, at a major medical institution who has experience evaluating and treating facial nerve paralysis.  If you would like any additional information, or recommendations, please send me a message.  Thanks for your question, and good luck!


New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Facial paralysis

+1

This is highly complex and needs a full examination and diagnostic testing. It is very unusual to get facial paralysis from a fall. You need to see a plastic surgeon who does facial palsy procedures. The nearest university hospital near you is a good start

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.