Left Side Looking Bigger Than Right Side After Gynecomastia Surgery

Hi I have had a gynecomastia surgery to both sides of my chest, but after a week the left side looked the same prior to the surgery. It has been 3 1/2 weeks now and the left side is still looking the same while the right side has decreased. What should I do?

Doctor Answers (10)

In the Immediate PostOp Period, Swelling Contributes to Asymmetry Following Male Breast Reduction

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It’s not unusual for patients to experience asymmetry following the surgical management of gynecomastia. In the immediate post-operative period, swelling and scarring may contribute to this asymmetry. It takes about six to twelve months for swelling to spontaneously resolve. In the majority of cases, patients are happy with their symmetry, once this occurs.

                  Unfortunately in a small number of patients, asymmetry persists after the resolution of swelling. When this occurs revisional surgery is often necessary.

                  It’s still very early in the post-operative course and your asymmetry may be related to swelling. This swelling can be minimized by utilizing compression garments and massage. Be patient and make sure you discuss your concerns with your surgeon.


Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 76 reviews

Be Patient

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 I understand your concern.  Was the procedure liposuction only?  Was your chest asymetrical before surgery.  Sometimes more work is done on one side causing more swelling.  I would give it 6 weeks wear your compression garment and then discuss your issues with the surgeon.

Miguel Delgado, Jr., MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

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Asymmetry after gynecomastia

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Frequently, the sides of the chest are asymmetrical to begin with and, if so, this may account for the variation. It would not be uncommon for patients to have more bruising or swelling on one side of the chest than in the other. I would recommend that you wait for three months, at minimum, after surgery and, if the condition does not improve, discuss it and proposed ways to correct the asymmetry with your plastic surgeon.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
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3 weeks post op

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Discuss everything with your surgeon and find out exactly what was done during the surgery. It is easier to suggest potential treatment options with a more complete clinical history.

Jay M. Pensler, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Los Angeles Male Breast Surgery

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Thank you for the question.

Given that  you are so early out from surgery, I would suggest to relax and not be so apprehensive about the asymmetry. It is not uncommon to have asymmetric swelling especially after gynecomastia surgery. Residual swelling can persist as long as 4 to 6 months in some cases. If, at that point, you still have a profound asymmetry, consult with your plastic surgeon for an evaluation.

Warmest Regards,

Glenn Vallecillos, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Glenn Vallecillos, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Gynecomastia surgery

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I would say to still wait until its been 3 months and then you can fully evaluate, but probably there is a bit more residual fullness on the left side. Oftentimes, the breast tissue may have been asymmetric before. It depends on the technique that was done in the surgery.  If it was only liposuction, or VASER, or ultrasonic or even laser liposuction I think there still will be fibrous tissue under the nipple that stays full. I think you have to include an "excisional" component to get the ideal flatness most patients are seeking.  I perform an aggressive chest wall liposuction with "pull through" excisional technique to remove that residual tissue.  This gives a nice flatness to the chest and the nipple/areola and often the areolar diameter shrinks as well which most men want. I would think you may need a "revision" where the excisional component can be added if you go to a board certified plastic surgeon that performs the minimal incision excisional technique as I do.  I hope this helps!

Sincerely,

James F. Boynton, M.D., F.A.C.S.

James F. Boynton, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Be patient

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Asymmetry is not uncommon both before and after surgery. It is early and your result will likely continue to improve. Two significant early factors are tissue swelling which takes time to resolve and more dramatically there can be a collection of fluid making one side look bigger. This can be easily drained with a needle in the office.

David J. Levens, MD
Coral Springs Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Asymmetry after gynecomastia correction

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There may be several reasons why you may be noticing asymmetry and they are best addressed by your plastic surgeon. Did you have an excisional procedure or just liposuction. If just liposuction is performed, it is sometimes difficult to remove the dense breast/glandular tissue and this might be what you see. There could also be natural differences in your chest that you are just knowing. You can also get fluid collections of either normal inflammatory fluid (seroma) or of blood (hematoma) that can be drained. Again, it is best to address these issues with your surgeon. Best of luck.

Joseph Michaels, MD
Bethesda Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

No change after Gynecomastia (male breast reduction)

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All breasts are uneven and to some degree this is normal. If however, there is a dramamtic difference between the two, I would discuss tis with your surgeon. Perhaps you have a hematoma/seroma that needs to be drained or perhaps you will require further surgery to reduce this even more.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.