Left Breast Looks Fuller on Top? (photo)

I had my surgery a month and 16 days ago. My left breast is fuller on the top which makes my cleavage look different between the two breast. When I wear a shirt the left breast pops out the top and the right side doesn't. They look like differnt shapes as well. I got 350cc in my right and 375cc in my left. What can I do? I feel very self consciousness about this and I'm not happy at all..

Doctor Answers (8)

Asymmetry after surgery

+2

I see your concern. I would be very interested to see you before photos. You could have had some breast asymmetry where one breast had much more definition than the other. If so, the implants have now simply magnified it. Otherwise I guess you should decide which side you like better and then try to have the other adjusted to match as best as possible.


Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Revision will improve breast asymmetry.

+1

Hi.

I suggest you do nothing for four months.  You actually look better than you think.  But eventually the asymmetry can be improved if it continues to bother you.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Breast asymmetry

+1

I do see what you are talking about, and it would be interesting to see your preop photos as well.  Give it more time as well, it is still early.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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Left Breast Looks Fuller on Top?

+1

Dear Blondie,

thank you for your question and photos.  The photos are not dated, but I assume they are in sequence?  It almost looks that you may be getting a slight capsular contraction higher breast on the last photo.  It is difficult to tell without a physical exam.  I would discuss your concerns with your plastic surgeon, have him suggest massaging techniques to lower the one side.  If this does not work, then a small revision will be able to give you better symmetry.

Best Wishes,

Pablo Prichard, MD

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Asymmetries after augmentation

+1

do occur with frequency as having perfectly equal breasts is rarely achieved.  Talk to your doctor about your concerns and for strategies for helping the higher side (I could not tell if you took your photos in a mirror or not but one side was fuller on top) settle more.  It can still happen, especially if you are diligent about it.  If you're a year out and still like this, and if you must have perfect symmetry, you would have to consider more surgery and surgery does not provide guarantees.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Uneven fullness of breasts 6 weeks post-op

+1

The fact that you have two different sized implants suggests that you probably had some degree of asymmetry prior to surgery, and while this might not have been the best answer, it might have been done in an attempt to correct a pre-existing asymmetry.  What that asymmetry was, if it existed, is hard to tell at this point given the pictures you have posted.  I can see what you are talking about with regard to the fullness in the upper pole of the left breast.  It also appears slightly wider at the base than the right breast.  Sometimes correcting asymmetry with merely an implant can be challenging because asymmetry can involve not only volume, but also width of the individual breasts, position of the breasts, tone of the breasts and amount of glandular versus fatty tissue, and the like, and differences in implants involve not only volume but dimensions like width, projection height, and the proportions between them, seen in the differences between the projection types like moderate, moderate plus, and high profile projections.  The main thing about this right now s that at 6 weeks your tissues haven't fully settled and softened, so it will be hard to evaluate what the final position of the implants and shape of the breasts will be at this point.  As long as the left breast isn't appreciably firmer or harder than the right, I would say that it does not involve capsule contracture, and you should continue massaging and give it more time to settle.  If the same asymmetry persists at 4 months post-op, then I would suggest that the 375 cc breast implant is projecting more than the 350 cc implant on your chest wall, and consideration should be given to reducing the size of the left implant.  While this itself may still leave an asymmetry of some form, it will at least reduce the upper pole projection of the left breast, and that is mainly what I think you object to.  Follow up closely with your surgeon and discuss these options with him or her.  Good luck.

Joseph L. Grzeskiewicz, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Left Breast Looks Fuller on Top?

+1

After breast augmentation the implants take several weeks to settle into position and for the swelling to resolve. After breast augmentation the basic shape and configuration of the breasts will be similar and not change drastically, but will be larger. Any differences that you may have had in your breast before the surgery can be amplified. Be patient. I suspect that in 6 months you will be very pleased with the results of the surgery.

Wesley T. Myers, MD
Conroe Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Left Breast Looks Fuller on Top?

+1

The best thing you can do for now is have some patience. Many patients who wind up with nice results are uneven early on. The implants under the muscle often look a bit high, and each settles at its own rate, and it can take 3-6 months. 

I would assume you had some asymmetry before surgery since you had different implants used. But without before photos it is difficult to make any specific suggestions.  Please consider posting additional photos. All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.