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What would you recommend to achieve a straight nose? (photos)

I've had 1 septo rhinoplasty and one revision rhinoplasty, and my nose is now more deviated than it was before my revision surgery. Will I ever be able to have a straight nose? And if so what should I ask for/ say to my next surgeon?

Doctor Answers (3)

What would you recommend to achieve a straight nose?

+1
I think it is reasonable to expect an improvement with a revision.  Find a rhinoplasty expert.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 237 reviews

Rhinoplasty candidate for crooked nose

+1
To straighten a crooked nose usually involves osteotomies of the nasal bones which involves re-breaking the nose. Medial and lateral osteotomies are required. A cartilaginous spreader graft is also inserted on the patient's concave upper lateral cartilage to give more symmetry in the mid vault area. For many examples of crooked nose repair in our practice, please see the links below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

How to get a straight nose

+1
Dear Costello
Many thanks for posting your question. Having had 2 rhinoplasties, you are now in a challenging position.
You still have a significant deviation to your nose, appearing to arise from your septum (the partition between the nostrils).
It might be that the only way to reliably correct this is to perform what is known as an extra-corporeal septoplasty, in which all the remaining septum is removed from your nose, and reshaped before being re-inserted. You might not have much cartilage left, and if not, some cartilage might need to be taken from your ears or ribs as a spare part.
Sorry if this sounds quite dramatic, but in situations like yours, all options have to be considered.
I wish you luck in improving your nose

Marc Pacifico, MD, FRCS(Plast)
London Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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