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What Happens if Latisse is Applied to Lower Lids?

I applied twice to lower lids by accident should I be concerned?

Doctor Answers (8)

Latisse on lower lids

+2

No worries.  It's not necessary to use Latisse on the lower lash line to have the lashes grow and it's definitely not dangerous.  For patients that do experience some staining of the skin from the product, though generally not objectionable on the upper lash line (quite well liked in many cases), most patients would prefer to avoid the possibility on the lowers.

 


Dr. Grant Stevens          


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

Latisse Applied To Lower Eyelashes

+1

I understand your concern; however, there is no need to worry because the solution is meant for the eyes. Latisse that is normally applied to the upper eyelids only has been known to transfer to the bottom lids as well, so if you happen to apply Latisse to the lower lid, you should not have a serious adverse effect or reaction. However, because of some of it transferring to the bottom lid from the top, we do not recommend patients apply it to the bottom. Some side effects may be the eye area becomes red and slightly irritated. “Dr. D”

Edward E. Dickerson, IV, MD
Fayetteville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Latisse is Safe for the Lower Eyelids

+1

It is not normally necessary to apply Latisse to the lower eyelids or eyelashes. When you blink your eyes after applying Latisse to the upper eyelids, some of the Latisse will be transferred to the lower lids. This is normal so you need not be concerned.

 

Mitchell Schwartz, MD
South Burlington Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Latisse on the Lower Lids

+1

It will do you no harm to use Latisse on the lower lids in addition to the upper lids. In the FDA trial, the lower lids were not included, so Latisse is only officially approved for the upper lids. Interestingly, we have found that just applying it to the upper lids also gives adequate contact of the product to the lower lids, with consequent increase in length, thickness and darkening of both the upper and lower lids. So, while you are doing yourself no harm, you are probably wasting the product and using it in excess.

Anthony J. Kameen, MD
Baltimore Ophthalmologist

It’s not recommended that Latisse be applied to the lower lids

+1

It’s not recommended that Latisse be applied to the lower lids. Basically, it’s because more of the product can get in the eye and then there is a higher chance of having eye side effects. If you apply it to the lower lids by accident, there shouldn’t be any problem, but I wouldn’t do it on a regular basis.

Joseph A. Eviatar, MD, FACS
New York Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Lower eye lid latisse

+1

Although not recommended by the company i have some patients who have applied latisse to their lower eyelids without any adverse effects. Most have seen eyelash growth . Latisse can cause irritationand skin discoloration so just monitor for that.

Joanne Lopes, MD
Virginia Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Latisse to Lower Lids

+1

You do not need to apply Latisse to the lower eyelids to have it work on the lashes there...One of the reasons to not apply to the lower eyelids is that with gravity, the drop when applied may run down one's face and cause hair growth or pigmentation of the skin.  Apply cautiously and carefully as directed by the manufacturer.

Sandy Feldman, MD
San Diego Ophthalmologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Latisse works on both upper and lower lids

+1

Don't worry! When you apply Latisse to your upper lid lashes, it transfers to the lower lids when you close your eyes.  If you applied it directly to the lower lid lashes, it's not a problem.  The medication in Latisse is safe for the eyes, as it originally was used as eye drops.

Randy J. Buckspan, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.