Laser on Upper Lip for Fine Red Vein, Is it Possible to Receive Nerve Trauma?

following on I am worried that my surgeon may have had the setting too high when he did the treatment on my red vein on my upper lip as it felt too powerful. He then treated the sides of my nose which were fine in comparison. If he did have the setting too high for my upper lip, and the fact i have an inplant in my upper lip, could the nerves have been too close to the suffice of my skin and therefore could i have received nerve trauma which then resulted in trigenial neuralgia?

Doctor Answers (2)

No nerve damage without a true burn

+2

Most cosmetic physicians treat superficial broken capillaries with a vascular laser.  There are a few options including the V-beam (candela) and KTP Gemini/Diolite (iridex/laserscope).  These lasers would absolutely not cause any nerve damage under normal laser settings with an experienced laser operator.  

If you were worried about nerve damage, I suspect you would not only have had an initial blister after your treatment, but you would have superficial skin damage as well which would be a cosmetic concern. My suspicion is that the laser worked well, but that the inflammation caused by the laser is making the area a little sensitive.  For this, I generally recommend using an ointment over the treated site for 1 week.


Springfield Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Nerve damage with laser treatment

+2

It is extremely unlikely that you may have sustained any type of nerve damage with laser treatment for broken superficial capillaries.  The reason you upper lip felt more sensitive during the treatment is because the skin is typically thinner in that area and therefore treatment tends to be more uncomfortable.  As long as you do not have any residual burn marks or wounds post treatment, any discomfort you had during or right post treatment will resolve.

Victoria Karlinsky, MD
Manhattan General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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