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Can eCO2 Laser Resurfacing Damage the Malar Bag?

I had the eCO2 facial resurfacing done about a year ago. Since then I have been experiencing puffiness at my left cheek bone which makes my under eye area look hallow. During my recovery period I asked the surgeon about my eyes looking hallow. His response was that the eCO2 could not cause this. Can laser resurfacing damaged the malar bag?

Doctor Answers (2)

ECO2 Laser

+1

I currently use the eCO2 (Lutronic) fractionated CO2 laser in my practice, and it is a very versatile laser capable of low intensity, intermediate, and fully ablative resurfacing.  The "malar bag" area is particularly sensitive to edema (swelling), especially in the healing phase after resurfacing.  The healing process correlates more with the power used for your treatment than the brand of fractionated laser.  A higher intensity treatment and/or various factors in your healing process may be contributing to the problem.  I think Dr. Shelton's suggestion of subtracting various skin care items from your regimen until after this problem resolves is a very good one and what i would recommend to you.


Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Carbon dioxide laser resurfacing

+1

Although I am not familiar with eCO2, I am familiar with carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers, both ablative and fractional. If there is fluid retention  in the cheek bone area, then the lower eyelid certainly can look hollow. It is doubtful that the laser induced any damage to the area. Sensitive skin can occur and sensitivities to topical products such as moisturizers, antioxidants, and sunscreens can occur, regardless of how often you've used them before, and they can cause chronic swelling. It might be worth a trial of abstaining from all topical products for one month to see if the swelling goes away.  Sinus problems can also exacerbate this swelling.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

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