How Does Laser Hair Removal Affect the Heart if Treating the Surrounding Area?

How Does Laser Hair Removal Affect the Heart if Treating the Surrounding Area?

Doctor Answers 4

Laser hair removal affecting underlying organs

A laser hair removal system penetrates a few millimetres into the dermis, so there is no risk at all of it penetrating deeper to affect the lungs, liver, heart or any other organ.


Toronto Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

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Heart unaffected by laser hair reduction treatments

The depth of penetration of the lasers for hair reduction is root of the hair follicle, which is located in the dermis. The laser beam does not penetrate deep enough to affect the heart.

Anifat Balogun, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon

Laser hair removal does not affect internal organs

Lasers create a beam of highly concentrated light that penetrates into the skin only where it delivers a controlled amount of therapeutic heat. This light energy is absorbed by the pigment located in the hair follicles. The laser pulses for a fraction of a second, just long enough to destroy numerous follicles at a time and leaves the surrounding skin unaffected. It will not affect any structures or organs such as the heart beneath the skin.

Mitchell Schwartz, MD
South Burlington Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Laser hair removal of chest

Laser hair removal of the chest is a very safe and effective procedure and does not affect the heart at all. The penetration of a laser used for hair removal is a few mm into the skin while the heart is situated many centimeters under the skin. In other words - no way can a laser hair removal laser penetrate deep enoug to affect the heart.

Jason Pozner, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.