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Can You Have a Large Nasal Spine Which Pushes the Columella Down Without Having a Tethered Lip?

and if so does removing this bone give you a shorter nose? in theory would this be moving the base of the nose? Is it normal to feel a prominent bone directly under your columella without any cushion or space in between?

Doctor Answers (4)

Prominent nasal spine

+1

 When a prominent nasal spine and caudal septum are present these are trimmed back to prevent columellar show. Many people who have a prominent nasal spine also have an active depressor septi ligament which is released at the same time during the rhinoplasty. For example similar to yours, please see the link below


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Columella and anterior nasal spine

+1

The columella position is influenced by the caudal septum and the anterior nasal spine as well as the medial portion of the lower nasal tip cartilages.  Modification of any of these structures will impact the columella.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Large Nasal Spine and Position of Columella

+1

A large nasal spine or a long septum can alter the position of the columella without having a tethered lip. Removing excess spine will not shorten the nose, measured by the distance between the radix and the tip.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Anterior Nasal Spine Concerns

+1

   An exam or pictures would help, but the columella can be reduced if the caudal septum is projecting too far inferiorly.  There is continuity of the caudal septum with the anterior nasal spine.  There does not have to be a tethering effect.  Find the plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of rhinoplasties each year.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 203 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.