How Can Labiaplasty Massage Increase the Risk of Infection?

Doctor Answers (4)

If done improperly yes.

+1

Hello,

Massage after labiaplasty is generally not needed if the operation is done well in the first place. Massaging too early can increase the wound breakdown and infection rate so I do not generally advise it in my patients. I would only do this if your surgeon recommended it.

 

Best Regards,

 

John Di Saia MD


Orange Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Labiaplasty massage

+1

Labia minora reduction is a technique to remove excess labial tissue. The suture used to repair the labia are typically small and delicate and theoretically, early massage could disrupt the sutures. After 2-3 weeks, though, massage should not be a problem and will not cause and damage or infection. I typically don't tell my patients to massage the tissue since the incisions heal very well with almost no scarring. I hope this helps.

Regards,

Daneil A. Medalie, MD

Daniel A. Medalie, MD
Cleveland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Infection

+1

I am unaware of a direct relationship. The only issue is if the incision is still healing, then aggressive massage could disrupt the edges of skin and leave an open wound. That could possible get infected. I do not have patients massage after surgery

Michael Hueneke, MD
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

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Labiaplasty Massage?

+1

Thank you for the question.

The labia minora reduction procedure is a patient pleasing operation with scars that  generally heal nicely.  Massage of the labia minora reduction incision line is not something I  routinely ask patients to do. Therefore, I am not aware of an increased risk of infection with massage of the area. 

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 716 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.