Ask a doctor

What Kind of Surgery Will Help with my Eyelid Asymmetry? (photo)

I want my left eye to look like my right eye. My left eye has excess skin and its outer corner is downturned much more than my right eye. Is there a surgery that can make my left eye look like my right eye? I want to avoid an overly opened look, so hopefully any surgery won't make the eye appear more open. Another concern I have about my eyes is I'd like them to be a little more closed because most of the time they appear to be more opened or "awake" than I'd like. I read that fillers can help.

Doctor Answers (9)

Correcting Asymmetrical Upper Eyelids with Blepharoplasty

+1

Correction of the asymmetry in your upper eyelids could be accomplished very easily w/ upper eyelid blepharoplasty surgery.

If you would like to change the position of the natural crease in your upper eyelid, to make it slightly lower, this would also be very straightforward to accomplish. Symmetry of the upper eyelids is a very common and important reason for upper eyelid blepharoplasty surgery.

See the link below for an example of a woman with eyelid asymmetry issues who achieved her desired result with blepharoplasty surgery.

In your case, I would recommend surgery as the best option to achieve symmetry vs. the non-surgical alternative of using a tissue filler in this area since the weight of the filler would make your eyelids feel much heavier, which would likely be uncomfortable for you.

Although your photos are helpful, you'll need an in-person consultation for a full assessment in order to make the best decision about what's right for you.


Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

What Kind of Surgery Will Help with my Eyelid Asymmetry?

+1

        The brow on the left is compensating for the slight ptosis, so you may want to attempt to get this fixed.  You could also consider Botox to drop the left brow a little.  This would improve brow symmetry but would not help the ptosis.                                                                                                                             Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Filler injection instead of blepharoplasty

+1

Your left upper eyelid/brow region is more hollow than the right side. Similar to a balloon collapsing after its air is let out, less fullness to upper eyelid/brow can make the skin appear loose. You may benefit from fat or filler injection into the left brow/eyelid area. See an oculoplastic surgeon for evaluation.

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

You might also like...

Upper eyelid asymmetry and ptosis

+1

You have a small degree of ptosis on the left upper eyelid that can be corrected with an in office local procedure.  It is possible to make your eyelids more even but absolute symmetry will be difficult to accomplish.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Asymmetrical upper lid folds

+1

Thanks for your photos.  The asymmetry could be corrected with a combination of simple office procedures.  I would place a stitch to anchor the left pretarsal fold to correct the lateral secondary fold on the left with a small fat transfer to the upper lateral sub-brow regions of both upper lids to correct the "overly opened look".  These procedures do not involve any cutting, so no risk of scars, and recovery is minimal. 

Randy Wong, MD
Honolulu Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Asymmetrical upper lids

+1

The asymmetry is very minimal, and probably not worth doing anything about, but  to correct this type of issue involves  a small incision whereby a small  amount of excess skin is removed from the lateral portion of left upper lid and  create a better crease to make the left eyelid symmetrical with the right eyelid

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Making Eyelids Look Symmetric

+1

Thank you for the question and the pictures. It looks like you have a bit more skin on one upper eyelid than the other. In addition, there is a slight lateral fold on the left and a bit more scleral show (the white part under the eye) on the left. All of these issues can be addressed with eyelid surgery (upper and lower blepharoplasty). It is important, however, to consider the risks as well as the benefits to this. From the pictures, it looks like you are pretty young. Please see a couple of doctors to discuss your goals before proceeding. Best of luck!

Evan Ransom, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

You photos are not a substitute for an actual personal consultation.

+1

From the photos, it looks like you might have a small degree of left upper eyelid ptosis.  This seems to be causing your to arch your left eyebrow.  I agree with the other poster, many people would not be bothered by the small difference you are showing between the right and left side.  However, if one were to think about helping these issues, it starts with a detailed consultation to determine what you like and what bothers you about your eyes.  This is followed by a detailed examination to measure and assess the basis for what is seen.  This information forms the basis of making a recommendation to address these concerns.  I don't think fillers will be the answer here.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Eyelid Asymmetry

+1

The tiny variation you have between lids is totally normal, we all have that. If you don't believe that, get any magazine about celebrities and look at any candid photos of the people we consider beautiful. They all have a significant difference between lids.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.