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Is It Better to Have IPL First Before Profractional?

I would like to have both done as I'm a vineyard worker and have much exposure to the elements. I have had both done before but I want to make sure I get the best results possible and would like to know if doing one first then the other?

Doctor Answers (2)

IPL should aLWAYS be done before ProFractional

+1

Intense Photo Light Treatment (IPL) or as Sciton, the most versatile IPL machine on the market refers to it - BBL (Broad Band Light), should ALWAYS be done before the ablative treatments (such as MicroLaser Peel or ProFractional) to ensure proper absorption of the light energy by the intended target (blemish, blood vessel, hair etc)


Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

IPL and Profractional for sun damage

+1

First and foremost: Use sunscreen, all year around. "Don't Leave Home Without It!"

There are some new, very strong, very effective sunscreens that last for 8 hours after one application and they are inexpensive.

As to the IPL and the profractional:

  • Both can help with treatment of pigmentation and redness.
  • Also with building of new collagen, and therefore, treatment of wrinkles.
  • First and foremost: Use sunscreeen all year around.
  • Both IPL and Profractional can help woyh pigmentation, redness and rebuilding of collagen.
  • Each has a different mode of action.

The IPL warms up the Dermis and stimulates new collagen formation, thus reducing the wrinkles and some of the diffuse redness.

It also warms the epidermo-dermal junction and thus clears some pigmentation.

It damages some capillaries and thos clears some of the red patches.

All of the above actions are performed also by the Profractional, by creating thousands of micro burn wounds in the epidermis and superficial dermis.

On the neck, the profractional can clear up some resistant red patches ("Red Neck") which the IPL may not be able to clear.

I hope this helps.

Eugene Mandrea, MD
Chicago Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.