What is Involved in the Revision Rhinoplasty to Improve a Pinched Nose?

Doctor Answers (7)

How to improve a pinched nose

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Nasal tip pinching is often due to weakening of the nasal tip cartilage. This is usually best treated using cartilage grafting using grafts from the septum, ear or rib.

The goal is to restabilize and reorient the tip cartilages to create more natural tip contours. Another benefit of this approach is that often nasal airflow is also improved.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Pinched appearance to nose after rhinoplasty usually the result of removal of too much cartilage.

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Overresection of the lateral arms of the tip cartilages can result in the appearance of a pinched tip.  Repair requires restoring the cartilage borrowed from the nasal septum or the ear.  The tip might also need to be supported which would require some additional rigid material.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Revision Rhinoplasty for Pinched Tip

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A pinched tip is secondary to the lack of volume, support, and structural integrity in the tip cartilages, whether this is inherited or secondary to previous surgery. Correction usually involves the placement of cartilage grafts to improve the contour and breathing function.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Revision rhinoplasty

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In situations where the nasal tip is pinched the cartilage making up the nasal tip has been over resected in the first rhinoplasty.  In this situation over time as scar tissue forms in the nasal tip the cartilage remnants become pinched.  This can be associated with nasal obstruction due to nasal valve compromise. To correct this problem the surgeon must rebuild the tip cartilage with tip  cartilage grafting. This cartilage can be obtained from the nasal septum or ear and in certain siuations the rib.  The cartilage will recreate the side walls of the tip and create a more natural appearing un pinched tip. In certain cases crushed cartilage can be added to either side of the pinch tip to soften the tip and improve the appearance of the nose.

Philip Solomon, MD
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Fixing a pinched nasal tip

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In the case of a pinched nasal tip revision rhinoplasty usually the cartilages left behind are weak.  In the case of a virgin nose, one that is not operated on, the issue is usally the same.  Cartilage grafting from either your septum or your ear is usually performed to provide strength and body to the new nasal tip.  As a rule a little bit of the cartilage volume will resorb/dissolve so if you feel like your tip is a little plump or big the first 2 to 4 weeks, don't be alarmed.  It will go down and look great.  Tip work like this can be done under local anesthesia without a problem.  Best of luck.  Chase Lay, MD

 

Chase Lay, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Pinched nose revision

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A pinched nose is due to weak lower cartilages often over-resected during previous surgery. The goal is to strengthen the tip usually with cartilage grafts.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

What is Involved in the Revision Rhinoplasty to Improve a Pinched Nose?

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A pinched nose is caused by excessive thinning and weakening of the paired Lower Lateral cartilages of the nose. By making them too narrow and weak, or worse yet by cutting them, the gentle arches making up the ceiling of the nostrils collapse either on a deep breath or permanently. The correction requires placement of a bolstering cartilage strip graft which braces and supports the lower lateral cartilage damaged in the first operation.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.