Internal Nasal Valve Collapse Surgery?

So I am 2 months post op and found out that I have internal nasal valve collapse obstructing my breathing. I am not sure if I want to take on the risk of another surgery though. If done, I would want it to be purely functional, and not aesthetical to try and minimize the risks. I was wondering if this type of surgery is safe and easy to do? Could it damage my nose even further? The last thing I expected was that my breathing would be worse, but I am scared to get this done. Thanks in advance.

Doctor Answers (6)

Can I have surgery to correct internal nasal valve collapse?

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It is possible to correct internal nasal valve collapse by the placement of spreader grafts which act to open up the internal valve so that air flows more smoothly through the nasal cavity. That being said, I would wait until you are at lease one year post op before considering this and have a thorough examination done by an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon to ensure that this will be an effective strategy.


Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Damage to the nasal valve sometimes occurs after rhinoplasty.

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Reducing the nasal dorsum particularly when the upper lateral cartilages are trimmed can create problems with the internal nasal valve. There is an operation to correct this which is not particularly difficult but should be postponed until all swelling has subsided.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Internal nasal valve collapse

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Collapse of the internal nasal valve is a functional physiologic problem.  This can be corrected by the placement of spreader grafts.  In your particular situation being 2 months post op you will need to wait for at least one year before considering a revision.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

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Internal Valve Collapse Affecting Breathing After Rhinoplasty

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Internal valve collapse is a functional complication which can effect breathing after rhinoplasty.  Typically, it results when the angle between the upper lateral cartilage and the nasal septum is narrowed.  Airflow through this narrow pathway results in increased airway resistance, and difficulty breathing through nose as you described.  Surgery to correct this problems targets methods to help stabilize the internal valve and reduce airflow resistance.  Spreader grafts are typically used.  They are small cartilage grafts "sandwiched" between the upper lateral cartilage an septum.  They function as a "strut" to stabilize the valve and increase the angle between the upper lateral cartilage and septum.  By doing so, they help to open the nasal airway for the patient.  Other functional causes of nasal obstruction need to be evaluated.  Persistence of a deviated septum or inferior turbinate hypertrophy will also need to be corrected if they exist to restore nasal function.  I suggest you consult with an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon who deals with nasal airway reconstruction.  Good Luck!

Anthony Corrado, DO
Philadelphia Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Nasal valve collapse treatment.

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Nasal valve collapse treatment usually consists of cartilage grafting. In some cases there is scar tissue present and the scar tissue needs to be removed and the area of skin collapse on the inside needs to be corrected. See a very experienced revision rhinoplasty surgeon for the best results.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Internal Nasal Valve Collapse Surgery?

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       Internal nasal valve collapse, if it is indeed the sole cause of breathing problems, can be improved with spreader graft placement.  This is a reliable measure, but it will widen the nose slightly.  Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of rhinoplasties and rhinoplasty revisions each year.  Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 237 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.